Number 1 among the Plethora of Lists

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 8, 2006 | Go to article overview

Number 1 among the Plethora of Lists


Byline: Jennifer Harper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

10 World Leaders Who Wear Footie Pajamas 8 Famous Parrots

A Dozen Celebrities Who Hiccup

The 10 Worst Area Rugs

Oh, my gosh. Hand over those lists and let's discover who wears Dr. Dentons and whether Paris and Britney have secret bilious moments. Maybe Drudge knows. Or Guinness.

What? Those are fake lists? Say it isn't so.

Alas, we confess, they are indeed fake compilations produced solely for amusement purposes. No parrots or area rugs were harmed in the process. But they could be real. There is a list for the top 10, top 20 and top 100 of anything and seemingly everything on the planet. Mankind revels in the best of, worst of, greatest, coolest, hottest, sexiest, tiniest, smelliest or scariest.

Want to put together an insider's rating for refrigerator magnets? It's been done. Hope to assemble the all-time most intriguing items that ever appeared on a grocery list? That's been done, too. In fact, it's a 240-page book.

"Milk Eggs Vodka," by Bill Keaggy will be published by HOW Books in a few months, based around the author's collection of grocery lists he found abandoned in carts, blowing around in the Safeway parking lot or flapping feebly in the gutter. The enterprising Mr. Keaggy has assembled and organized 1,300 of these lists to reveal that a surprising percentage of Americans do not know how to spell mayonnaise, banana, anchovy and yogurt.

His Web site (www.grocery lists.org) displays hundreds of the long-lost lists, and Mr. Keaggy says he is always looking for more.

But back to everybody else's bright ideas.

The U.S. Hurricane Research Center has just assembled the top 10 worst places to live should one not enjoy storm surges and lawn furniture circling the house at 125 mph. The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society is looking for nominations for its list of the "world's greatest moments in materials and engineering history," to be unveiled with considerable ceremony at Walt Disney World next year.

Not to be outdone, the Social Security Administration compiles the top 10 baby names for both sexes every year - Emily and Jacob are in the lead. Mitsubishi Motors named the top 10 strangest street names: Psycho Path in Traverse City, Mich., and Divorce Court in Heather Highlands, Pa., were first and second. The American Pie Council named the top five holiday pies: pumpkin, apple, cherry and lemon meringue, with pecan, chocolate cream and mincemeat tied for fifth.

There also are strangely disquieting lists, such as "100 Things to See Before You Die," a 1999 book by Neil Teplica, who suggests that one participate in the World Cow Chip Throwing Championship in Beaver, Okla. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Number 1 among the Plethora of Lists
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.