Shopping with Newt

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 10, 2006 | Go to article overview

Shopping with Newt


Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Shopping with Newt

A battle for the title of the finest neighborhood is brewing historic Georgetown versus suburban McLean although it's starting to smell of politics.

We turn to the current issue of the Georgetowner, a local newspaper that didn't take kindly to the New Republic's recent magazine headline: "So long, Georgetown. McLean is the new home of America's ruling class."

Wouldn't you know The Washington Post next ran with the story "and all but declared it official," the Georgetowner notes in an editorial.

Not to be outdone, the editors of the local paper are offering their own partisan perspective on the two diverse communities, stating in part: "When you enter McLean, Va., .. one of the first things you see is a huge green sign declaring, 'George Bush Center for Intelligence.' This is your clue to turn around and go no further. ..

"When you grocery shop at the McLean Safeway, you run into Newt Gingrich, Ken Starr and Bill Kristol. When you shop at the Georgetown Safeway, you run into the likes of George Stephanopoulos, Elizabeth Taylor, Kitty Kelley, and Madeleine Albright. Now, I ask you, whom would you rather say hello to?"

The editors go on to recall that John F. Kennedy once lived in Georgetown, while "Dick Cheney and his wife lived in McLean when he was a top official at Halliburton. Colin Powell, secretary of state under George W. Bush, lives in McLean. Madeleine Albright, secretary of state under Bill Clinton, lives in Georgetown."

Finally, nobody should be surprised to read that Georgetown has a population of 14,000, 12,000 of whom are Democrats.

Open for discussion

Five months after June's flooding rains swept into the National Archives, causing millions of dollars in damage, the building's William G. McGowan Theater will have its grand reopening Thursday night.

And no better time at that, given all the latest shenanigans on Capitol Hill, for archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and historian Robert Remini to discuss "The U.S. Congress: History and Turning Points," starting at 7 p.m. Mr. Remini happens to be the official historian for the U.S. House of Representatives.

In fact, he's been teaching history for more than 50 years and writing books about American history for nearly as long more that a dozen books in all, including a three-volume biography of Andrew Jackson, and biographies of Henry Clay and Daniel Webster. …

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