Parents of ESE Students Can Get Education Data; Its Importance to Families of Elementary Kids, Is Stressed, Too

By Hurst, Mary | The Florida Times Union, September 23, 2006 | Go to article overview

Parents of ESE Students Can Get Education Data; Its Importance to Families of Elementary Kids, Is Stressed, Too


Hurst, Mary, The Florida Times Union


Byline: MARY HURST

YULEE - Parents of exceptional education students are urged to attend a meeting on Monday to find out what diploma options are available for their children.

Jan McKay, co-author of a Florida Department of Education pamphlet, "Diploma Decisions for Students with Disabilities: What Parents Need to Know," will speak.

Students in Exceptional Student Education are children who have been identified by teachers, medical experts and other district staff as having conditions that limit or impair both physical and intellectual capabilities.

Children diagnosed with conditions such as autism, muscular dystrophy, emotional handicaps, including personality and psychiatric disorders, reading disabilities or those tested as having IQs lower than 70 often are placed in ESE. Children with hearing or vision loss also often enter ESE.

Melinda Willaford is chairwoman of the Exceptional Student Education Parent Advisory Council and has an autistic child. The Parent Advisory Council advises the Nassau County School Board on needs of ESE students and assists parents with questions about ESE programs.

Willaford said it's important that parents of ESE students learn early on what educational options are available.

"The foundation you lay with your child's Individual Education Plan team in elementary school determines what kind of diploma options the child will have later on," she said.

Every ESE student is required by federal law to have an Individual Education Plan. Special education teachers, school psychologists, social workers and medical personnel, if necessary, make up the IEP team. They recommend what special accommodations a student may need to accomplish educational and behavioral goals. Parents are invited to review their child's IEP at least once yearly.

Willaford said in the Nassau County School System, there are four graduation options, but the special accommodations required or chosen for the child determine what kind of diploma they are eligible to receive upon graduation.

Examples of accommodations or modifications that can be included in the IEP are using adaptive educational tools such as calculators or tape recorders; having tests read aloud to students; changing a classroom to provide a work station adapted to a wheelchair; and allowing students additional time to complete assignments.

The accommodations chosen for a child in elementary school can affect his or her ability to take the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test, which all students have to pass to receive a standard diploma.

"This is why it's important to attend," Willaford said. "You've got to know that the decisions you make for your child in elementary school can affect your child's diploma options."

Francis Flood, liaison between the school board and the parent advisory group, said he would particularly encourage parents of kindergartners and first-graders to attend Monday's meeting. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Parents of ESE Students Can Get Education Data; Its Importance to Families of Elementary Kids, Is Stressed, Too
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.