EDI Is Not Rocket Science; Newspaper Association of America Executive Says Electronic Data Interchange Will Not Be a Daunting Task for Newspapers to Initiate

By Giobbe, Dorothy | Editor & Publisher, April 30, 1994 | Go to article overview

EDI Is Not Rocket Science; Newspaper Association of America Executive Says Electronic Data Interchange Will Not Be a Daunting Task for Newspapers to Initiate


Giobbe, Dorothy, Editor & Publisher


Newspaper Association of America executive says Electronic Data Interchange will not be a daunting task for newspapers to initiate

TO THE UNINFORMED or newly initiated, Electronic Data Interchange implementation may seem a daunting task that involves complex terms and functions.

But at the recent Newspaper Association of America-sponsored EDI/Prepress Symposium in Orlando, John Iobst, director of advanced computer science at the NAA, assured attendees, "EDI is not rocket science!"

Seeking to reinforce the importance of EDI and its role in newspaper systems, Iobst said, "EDI is complicated but it doesn't require a lot of new skills that we don't already use at newspapers. It's managing the information that we're already managing but managing it electronically."

Getting started in an EDI program should be regarded as a new and more efficient way of conducting business, Iobst added.

"[EDI] insinuates itself within a newspaper and within a year or a year and a half, you'll feel like you've been doing it forever."

Some advice

For newspapers, planning for EDI implementation is critical in order not to be "blindsided" by unforeseen complications and problems, Iobst said.

When planning, there are a few different areas that newspapers should consider, he said. First, newspapers must select a value-added network. Because advertisers may use different systems, some newspapers will use multiple VANs.

Planning for EDI also should include translator selection, application migration, support systems and hardware, trading partner agreements, financial planning, resource allocation and a timetable, Iobst said.

Newspapers should work closely with advertisers to determine each other's needs.

"When we talk to advertisers," Iobst said, "there are three things they ask for: electronic purchase orders . . . electronic copy . . . and an electronic invoice."

Also, Iobst said, "Most advertisers that I've talked to are as interested in doing electronic remittance with newspapers as they are doing the rest of EDI." That's because "they are moving to as paperless an operation as they can."

Newspapers should keep in mind that "you are not alone" and open communication lines with "traditional vendors," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

EDI Is Not Rocket Science; Newspaper Association of America Executive Says Electronic Data Interchange Will Not Be a Daunting Task for Newspapers to Initiate
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.