African Film Puts World Bank, IMF on Trial: The Glitterati Assembled at the Cannes Film Festival in May to Strut Their Stuff, but One Film Stood out, Bamako. It Made Uncomfortable Viewing for the Economists at the World Bank and IMF

New African, October 2006 | Go to article overview

African Film Puts World Bank, IMF on Trial: The Glitterati Assembled at the Cannes Film Festival in May to Strut Their Stuff, but One Film Stood out, Bamako. It Made Uncomfortable Viewing for the Economists at the World Bank and IMF


Africa's lone entry in this year's Cannes Film Festival in France aimed to speak for millions with its ambitious tale of putting the World Bank and IMF on trial for the monetary policies choking African nations.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Bamako, a jewel of a film from the Malian director, Abderrahmane Sissako, hoped to demonstrate the impact these policies were having on the lives of Africans. The film was shown in official selection, but out-of-competition at the 59th edition of the annual international film festival held in Cannes in southern France.

It depicts a makeshift court, including a judge in an ermine-trimmed red robe, set up in a poor quarter of the Malian capital, Bamako, in a courtyard as women look after their children and kids play football nearby.

The witnesses, including Mali's former culture minister, Aminata Traore, parade before the court to tell their stories. Most of those appearing in the witness box are, however, the anonymous and oppressed the real victims of the austerity budgets drawn up by the World Bank and IMF for struggling African nations. Debt repayments, which absorb an astonishing 40% of the budgets of Kenya and Zambia, is a recurrent leitmotif.

The film avoids trying to manipulate the court, and the institutions on trial also have a right to defence lawyers. But in a scene in which bank notes change hands, Sissako shows that corruption is not just a myth here. Above all his film seeks to speak for a continent.

"I was very aware that from my small position, and because I make films, I have to try to be the voice of millions of people," Sissako told the AFP in measured tones. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

African Film Puts World Bank, IMF on Trial: The Glitterati Assembled at the Cannes Film Festival in May to Strut Their Stuff, but One Film Stood out, Bamako. It Made Uncomfortable Viewing for the Economists at the World Bank and IMF
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.