Centuries of Glass Act

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), October 21, 2006 | Go to article overview

Centuries of Glass Act


Byline: By Jeffery Muse

Glass is one of the most remarkable materials.

It is believed the first examples were made as early as the 15th century BC, probably in Egypt as there are several instances of glass beads being uncovered there, especially in tombs. So far the earliest glass vessels are three vases bearing King Thotmes III cartouche (1501-1449BC), one of which resides in the British Museum, another in the Munich Antiquarium and the last is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

All of them are turquoise.

Natural, soda glass has a greenish tinge, so it would suggest that even as early as this, the art of colouration was known and understood.

Naturally, any Egyptian glass had a ready market nearby and further abroad as its lustre and sheer brilliance must have been appreciated by all who saw it, especially those unable to afford any such luxuries.

This naturally encouraged curiosity and it was not long before the craft spread throughout the Middle East and beyond as these were nomadic people, moving with the seasons over vast distances and exchanging goods as they went.

The art of glass making quickly spread all over the region as all raw materials were close by. It was an art that encouraged co-operation and collusion as each maker exchanged ideas with a neighbour and so spread knowledge far beyond any man-made boundaries.

Soon glass was made all round the Mediterranean waters but no great strides in technique occurred until Alexander the Great conquered Asia Minor, Palestine and Egypt and made Alexandria the centre of his empire, along with his master craftsmen which included the best glass makers that soon overran the whole of the Egyptian industry.

So rapid was this development, trading links reached as far as England and Scandinavia and it would have been these experts who brought their skill to Rome around 2,000 years ago.

Until the Christian era, it appears the Italians showed little interest in glass and its first mention appeared in a speech by Cicero of 54BC, but then the Roman army conquered Egypt in 27BC and the art of glass blowing was discovered which revolutionised the industry. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Centuries of Glass Act
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.