Lutheran-Catholic Dialogue: The Church as Koinonia of Salvation

By Ryan, William | Journal of Ecumenical Studies, Spring 2004 | Go to article overview

Lutheran-Catholic Dialogue: The Church as Koinonia of Salvation


Ryan, William, Journal of Ecumenical Studies


The final meeting of the Tenth Round of the Lutheran-Catholic Dialogue in the United States met April 22-25, 2004, at St. John's Cathedral in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The principal task of the meeting was to finalize a text on The Church as Koinonia of Salvation: Its Structures and Ministries. The meeting also provided an opportunity to celebrate both this dialogue and the fifth anniversary of the signing of the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification in a service at the cathedral on April 23, with the Presiding Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Mark Hanson, preaching. Archbishop Timothy Dolan of Milwaukee welcomed the members of the dialogue to the cathedral, and Bishops Charles Maahs and Richard Sklba, co-chairs of the dialogue, presided at the ecumenical celebration.

The 1999 signing of the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification by the Holy See and the Lutheran World Federation was a high-water mark in Lutheran-Catholic relations, resolving the problem of grace and good works that was at the heart of Reformation disagreements. On the basis of this agreement, scholars representing the churches have been able to go back to the theological work of applying this agreement to other issues that must be resolved if full communion is to be achieved. While this text does not call for full mutual recognition of ordained ministries or the integration of ecclesial structures, it proposes important new clarifications and pastoral steps that will serve the pilgrimage toward full unity.

The new dialogue text is a particularly long statement on the church, compared with earlier contributions of this dialogue. It provides over 100 pages of conclusions, along with the biblical, historical, and theological foundations for these recommendations. The text carefully links the biblical doctrine of justification to the development of the church in the New Testament as a community of salvation, whose structures and ministries serve the church's mission to the human family.

A detailed exposition is given to the development of the ministries and structures in the church: councils, dioceses, parishes, bishops, presbyters, and the Petrine ministry. The common history prior to the Reformation is accompanied by a clarification of the differences in theology both before and aider the Reformation, showing where a common core of the Christian faith and practice found different expressions in separate Lutheran and Catholic developments in the episcopacy, in congregational life, and both in the understanding of church structures from the Reformation and in recent ecumenical rapprochement. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lutheran-Catholic Dialogue: The Church as Koinonia of Salvation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.