In Praise of Hugo Chavez

By McCarthy, Colman | National Catholic Reporter, October 13, 2006 | Go to article overview

In Praise of Hugo Chavez


McCarthy, Colman, National Catholic Reporter


Bless Hugo Chavez. In a mid-September speech at the United Nations, the president of Venezuela called George W. Bush a devil--and a malodorous one at that, who left a smell of sulfur on the speaker's podium where the previous day he declared his love of peace.

For speaking undiplomatically among the diplomats, President Chavez was pummeled. "He's an everyday thug," said Nancy Pelosi, the Democrat's leading lady in the House. John Boehner, the Republican House majority leader, labeled Mr. Chavez "a power hungry autocrat." CBS News assessed him as "a blowhard." Brit Hume, Fox's slanter, spread fear as recklessly as the Bush administration he so admires by speculating that Mr. Chavez has so much oil money that "he can give it to terrorists" and "maybe he's doing it." Mr. Chavez "would be much more effective if he would say something that's true," said truth-teller Bill ("I did not have sex with that woman") Clinton.

Critics of Hugo Chavez's devil comment might have-a case if President Bush were not presiding over the hell of secret CIA dungeons these past years. They would have a case if uncharged and lawyerless prisoners were not rotting in the hell of Guantanamo since 2001. They would have a case if the Bush presidency had not turned much of Iraq into a living hell for its citizens. They would have a case if Mr. Bush had not spent much of September pressing Congress to let him continue to flout the Geneva Conventions and Constitution by allowing the CIA to torture people on the suspect list.

If hell, as Christian theologians insist, is where the devil does his torturing, then Chavez is close to having it right metaphorically and possibly literally: The president's devilish policies have created hell on earth for those trapped in dungeons and doomed in war zones.

I don't remember an outcry from the Chavez critics when Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In Praise of Hugo Chavez
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.