Forecasting Is Best Defense against Hurricanes

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 25, 2006 | Go to article overview

Forecasting Is Best Defense against Hurricanes


Byline: J. Hope Babowice

You wanted to know

Blanca Casillas, 10, of Mundelein wanted to know:

Can people make a hurricane less powerful? Why doe sa hurricane go to certain places? How does a hurricane make itself?

If you have a question you'd like Kids Ink to answer, write Kids Ink, care of the Daily Herald, 1795 N. Butterfield Road, Suite 100, Libertyville, IL 60048 or send an e-mail to lake@@dailyherald.com. Along with the question, include your name, age, phone number, hometown, grade and school.

For more information

To learn more about hurricanes, the Warren Newport Public Library in Gurnee suggests the following.

DVDs

- "Hurricanes & Tornadoes," hosted by Spencer Christian

- "Friends to the Rescue" created by Sesame Street Workshop

Books

- "Eye of the Storm: A Book About Hurricanes" by Rick Thomas

- "Hurricanes" by Seymour Simon

- "Howling Hurricanes" by Louise and Richard Spilsbury

- "Hurricane and Typhoon Alert!" by Paul Challen

- "Hurricane Hunters and Tornado Chasers: Life In The Eye of the Storm" by Lois Sakany

"Can people make a hurricane less powerful? Why does a hurricane go to certain places? How does a hurricane make itself?" asked Blanca Casillas, 10, a fourth-grader at Diamond Lake School in Mundelein.

A hurricane is one of Mother Nature's fiercest storms. Starting small, the storms brew in the Atlantic Ocean, starting small as a tropical cyclone. With the right conditions, wind speeds kick up to more than 33 mph, whipping the cyclone into a hurricane.

Last year was the worst on record for hurricanes. In 2005, scientists recorded the highest number of topical storms - 27 - and hurricanes - 15. Of those 15 hurricanes, a record four touched down in the United States and four were the most powerful type of hurricanes, what scientists call category 5. Last year's disasters caused the worst damage on record. Katrina and Rita wrecked hundreds of miles of coastline, caused loss of life as well as billions of dollars in damage. …

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