Fourth District Employment

Economic Trends, October 2006 | Go to article overview

Fourth District Employment


The Fourth District's unemployment rate fell 0.1 percentage point to 5.6% in August. Employment increased 0.1%, unemployment decreased 0.6%, and the labor force grew 0.1% over the month. The national unemployment rate for August (4.7%) was nearly 1% lower than the District's.

In the overwhelming majority (150 out of 169) of the District's counties, unemployment rates remained above the national average. Over the month, unemployment rates rose in 64 counties, fell in 87, and stayed the same in 18. Of the District's major metropolitan areas, Lexington had the lowest unemployment rate (4.5%) and Toledo had the highest (6.6%). Lexington's rate improved by 0.4 percentage point from the previous month.

Although payroll employment growth in Cincinnati and Lexington exactly matched the U.S. rate of 1.3% over the year, it was negative for Cleveland (-0.1%) and Dayton (-0.8%). Goods-producing employment growth fell short of the U.S. rate in all of the District's major metropolitan areas. Service-providing employment fared better, with growth in Cincinnati and Lexington outpacing the U.S. average for that industry. Education and health services and the leisure and hospitality industry both posted positive employment growth over the year, surpassing the U.S. average in several metro areas. In the information industry, however, none of the District's major metro areas reported employment growth over the year.

[GRAPHICS OMITTED]

Payroll Employment by Metropolitan Statistical Area

                                12-month percent change, August 2006

                             Cleveland    Columbus  Cincinnati  Dayton

Total nonfarm                     -0.1         0.6         1.3    -0.8
  Goods-producing                 -0.1         0.4         0.4    -1.9
    Manufacturing                  0.5         0.4        -0.2    -3.2
    Natural resources,
     mining, and
     construction                 -2.1         0.5         1.8     3.1
  Service-providing               -0.1         0.6         1.5    -0.5
    Trade, transportation,
     and utilities                -0.3         0.3         0.5    -3.7
    Information                   -1.5        -0.5         0.0    -3.6
    Financial activities          -0.5        -1.0         0. … 

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