How Hugo Chavez Lost the Latin American Seat on the UN Security Council

Manila Bulletin, November 16, 2006 | Go to article overview

How Hugo Chavez Lost the Latin American Seat on the UN Security Council


Byline: Beth Day Romulo

A YEAR ago I went into the UN General Assembly early to hear President Arroyo speak and didn't know the man who was speaking. I looked up on the list. It was Hugo Chavez, president of Venezuela, all bombast and fury, and viciously anti-US. Anti-US is not unusual among developing countries but normally criticism is delivered with more civility. This was a thumb-your-nose style, out of place in the dignity of the UN Assembly. This year he did it again - going over the stop in a critique of the US President, calling him the "Devil" and saying he could still "smell the sulphur" at the podium. Some delegates giggled - but most seemed to agree it was out of place. What puzzled me was why Chavez would be so confrontational when he was lobbying hard to get Latin America's seat in the UN Security Council. The SC has five permanent members and 10 non-permanent rotating members from other regions, for a two-year term, who are voted upon by the Assembly. When the Philippines won the Asian seat two years ago it was fortunate that the Security Council presidency, which is also rotating, gave them two shots at it during their two-year term, which allowed Pres. Arroyo to chair the SC summit last year.

The reason for Chavez's behavior appears to be that he counted on enough anti-American sentiment among poor and developing nations, to win him the prize. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Hugo Chavez Lost the Latin American Seat on the UN Security Council
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.