A Checklist of Scholarship on Southern Literature for 1991

The Mississippi Quarterly, Annual 1992 | Go to article overview

A Checklist of Scholarship on Southern Literature for 1991


This checklist, the twenty-third published by The Society for the Study of Southern Literature, was prepared by the Society's Committee on Bibliography: George C. Longest, Chairman (Virginia Commonwealth University), Rebecca Butler (Dalton College), J. Lasley Dameron (Memphis State University), Thomas E. Dasher (Valdosta State College), Ruel E. Foster (West Virginia University), Linda M. Garner (David Lipscomb University), W. Bert Hitchcock (Auburn University), Susan Peters (Emory University), Verbie L. Prevost (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga), Milton Rickels (University of Southwestern Louisiana), Anne E. Rowe (Florida State University), Welford D. Taylor (University of Richmond), Charles S. Watson (University of Alabama), Mary Louise Weaks (Rockford College), Jerry T. Williams (Mississippi State University), and Annette Woodlief (Virginia Commonwealth University), Waldemar Zacharasiewicz (Institut fur Anglisiik und Amerikanistik der Universitat Wien).

Special thanks to Benjamin Franklin Fisher IV (University of Mississippi) and to M. Thomas Inge (Randolph-Macon College) for furnishing needed publications.

The checklists for 1968-1987 appeared in the spring issues of the Quarterly for the following years. Beginning with the list of 1988 publications, the checklist has appeared in a supplementary issue of the Quarterly. The first eight are conflated and supplemented in Southern Literature 1968-1975: A Checklist of Scholarship, ed. Jerry T. Williams (Boston: G. K. Hall, 1978). Scholarship published prior to 1968 may be found in A Bibliographical Guide to the Study of Southern Literature, ed. Louis D. Rubin, Jr. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1969). Items which carry the 1991 date but appeared too late for this list will appear in next year's.

The symbols and abbreviations used are those of the MLA International Bibliography. (A key to abbreviations not included there appears at the end of this checklist.) Cross-references for authors not in the main list appear at the end, and an Index of Authors of works listed in the checklist, keyed by entry numbers, appears at the very end.

Items for the checklist should be sent to the chairman of the committee: George C. Longest, Department of English, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond VA 23284, who would like to thank all who have contributed during the past year.--G. C. L. Checklist editor: Jerry T. Williams Computer Programmer and Consultant: W. Edwin Ellis

I. COLONIAL (1607-1800)

1. [BARTRAM, WILLIAM] Stringher, Bonalda. "The South as a Garden: The Travels of William Bartram," in The United States South: Regionalism and Identity, ed. Valeria Gennaro Lerda and Tjebbe Westendorp. Rome: Bulzoni Editore, 1991, pp. 107-121.

Bartram's Travels was the account of a traveler who "had not studied nature" but "experienced it," became "immersed in it," a "deeply feeling|I'." In this work, Bartram "builds a garden of words." In thinking back over his travels as he wrote his book, Bartram "acts upon reality" but puts everything "into a perspective where evil could find no place."

See also 1053.

2. [DRAYTON, WILLIAM HENRY] Snapp, J. Russell. "William Henry Drayton: The Making of a Conservative Revolutionary." JSH, 77 (November 1991), 637-658.

Believing that only an aristocratic government "could prevent tyrannical, arbitrary rule by either a majority or a minority," Drayton turned against British rule in America only after he concluded that Britain was seeking "to deny the colonies the aristocratic, balanced government that the Glorious Revolution had produced." He expressed his views in A Letter from Freeman.

See also 21.

3. [HAMILTON, DR. ALEXANDER] Kukla, Jon. "The Tuesday Club." SLJ, 24 (Fall 1991), 115-118.

An essay-review of Robert Micklus's 1991 edition of The History of the Ancient and Honorable Tuesday Club. This "is great fun to read.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Checklist of Scholarship on Southern Literature for 1991
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.