BOOK REVIEWS: Costly Battle in Second World War; Anzio: The Friction of War - Italy and the Battle for Rome 1944 by Lloyd Clark, Headline Review, Pounds 20

The Birmingham Post (England), November 25, 2006 | Go to article overview

BOOK REVIEWS: Costly Battle in Second World War; Anzio: The Friction of War - Italy and the Battle for Rome 1944 by Lloyd Clark, Headline Review, Pounds 20


Byline: Reviewed by Prof Gary Sheffield

It is sometimes said that the soldiers of the Second World War had an easier time than the PBI in the First World War.

If anyone believes this they need to read Lloyd Clark's gripping new book on Anzio.

Clark, a military historian at Sandhurst, tells the story of a battle in 1944 that was as grim as anything experienced at the Somme or Passchendaele. Yet it was all supposed to be so different.

Winston Churchill, scarred by his memories of the Western Front, succeeded in persuading his reluctant American allies to fight in the Mediterranean in 1943 rather than going for the direct route to Germany through France.

In one of his worst miscalculations of the war, Churchill believed that Italy was the "soft underbelly" of Europe.

It proved to be anything but.

The Allied armies faced mountain range after mountain range and river after river, defended by tough and skilful German troops under "Smiling Albert" Kesselring, an airman turned general who proved to be one of the best defensive commanders of the war.

Bogged down in front of the notorious Monte Cassino, position well to the south of Rome, the Allies decided to move a force by sea, and land it behind the German lines at the seaside resorts of Anzio and Nettuno. This, surely, would break the deadlock and rapidly lead to the seizure of the Eternal City.

The Allies landed largely unopposed on January 22, 1944, but a combination of indecision by the commander on the spot and an extremely rapid response by the Germans pinned the British and Americans onto the beaches.

A four-month siege resulted, and Rome did not fall until May - when the Allies had at last broken through at Cassino. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

BOOK REVIEWS: Costly Battle in Second World War; Anzio: The Friction of War - Italy and the Battle for Rome 1944 by Lloyd Clark, Headline Review, Pounds 20
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.