Investigations: Putin, Russia and an Ex-Spy's Mysterious Death

By Hosenball, Mark; Isikoff, Michael et al. | Newsweek, December 4, 2006 | Go to article overview

Investigations: Putin, Russia and an Ex-Spy's Mysterious Death


Hosenball, Mark, Isikoff, Michael, Matthews, Owen, Newsweek


Byline: Mark Hosenball, Michael Isikoff and Owen Matthews

Until a few days ago, U.S. and British government inves-tigators had never heard of anyone being poisoned by the obscure and unstable isotope polonium-210. Now its extreme rarity is adding to the riddles in the death of exiled former Rus- sian spy Alexander Litvinenko, an outspoken critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Just before falling ill, the dissident received a document that seemed to warn of threats from an alleged secret fraternity of former KGB men calling themselves "Dignity and Honor," says Lord Tim Bell, a former Margaret Thatcher adviser close to Litvinenko's circle.

Who silenced Litvinenko? His family and supporters insist Russian agents did it. Investigators in London think such a lethal dose must have been industrially produced--a job that usually takes not only bismuth metal for raw material but a nuclear reactor to bombard it with neutrons. "It's not something you can go into a drugstore and get off a shelf," says a nuclear-agency official, asking to be nameless because of the sensitive topic. "To get this amount of highly concentrated radioactivity would take a very sophisticated operation, access to nuclear materials and support systems," Litvinenko's friend and fellow Russian exile Alex Goldfarb told news-week. Last week he released a statement he says was dictated by Litvinenko as he died, blaming Putin for the poisoning: "The howl of protest from around the world will reverberate, Mr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Investigations: Putin, Russia and an Ex-Spy's Mysterious Death
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.