Classic-Style Homes Inspire His Work

By Murphy, Jean | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Classic-Style Homes Inspire His Work


Murphy, Jean, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Jean Murphy Daily Herald Correspondent

Pat Mastrodomenico likes to use stone, stucco and brick to build classic-style homes that look like they have been in place for a long time.

The homes' interiors also have a stately look, but hidden between the walls are the latest, state-of-the-art amenities such as high-tech phone and Internet systems, cameras and even steamers that give upscale homeowners the ultimate in convenience and security.

"I came here from Italy where everything is built of stone. So when I build a home, I build something that can be there forever. I believe that the quality has to be there before you cover it up with the finishes," said Mastrodomenico, owner of Mastro Design/Builders of Palatine.

Born in Bari, Italy, this son of a carpenter said he was inspired at an early age by the timeless architectural charms of his native country.

"I was captivated by the architectural romanticism of the ornate villas and stately palazzos of Italy," he said. "I loved the natural beauty and rough-hewn character of the stone facades and the understated grace and strength of their designs. It opened up my eyes to the creative possibilities of building and architecture."

After he and his parents emigrated to the United States in 1971, Mastrodomenico pursued his degree in architecture at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

He worked for a number of suburban architectural firms before eventually becoming a home builder himself in the late 1980s.

The first home he built was a two-story residence in Addison for his parents. The successful project gave him the self-confidence to become a full-time builder and he began purchasing home sites and building custom homes.

Mastrodomenico, who lives in Bloomingdale, founded Mastro Design/Builders in 1992. He now builds four to six homes per year in the $1.5 million to $2.5 million price range.

Over the years he has built homes in the West and Northwest suburbs, but now is concentrating on Kildeer and Long Grove. He enjoys the terrain variations in the area, which allow for walkout and lookout lower levels.

His dream house: A cozy stone mansion in the Italian Renaissance style overlooking the ocean on Italy's Amalfi Coast.

Favorite new home amenity: "I love the radiant-heated floors," the 46-year-old father of three says. "There is nothing better than seeing your 6-year-old walking on warm floors in the morning."

Now building in: Meadowwoods Estates in Kildeer and Long Meadow Farms in Lake County near Long Grove. …

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