More Click It with Threat of a Ticket; 81% Wear Seat Belts in U.S.; Higher Usage Where Buckling Up Is Law

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 3, 2006 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

More Click It with Threat of a Ticket; 81% Wear Seat Belts in U.S.; Higher Usage Where Buckling Up Is Law


Byline: Joyce Howard Price, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Fewer Americans are wearing seat belts compared with last year, but usage continues to be higher in states where motorists can be pulled over solely because they are not wearing a safety belt, a new federal study shows.

Seat-belt use climbed from 58 percent in 1994 to 81 percent this year. It reached an all-time high in 2005 at 82 percent, according to a report released last week by the Department of Transportation.

"A seat belt doesn't work if it isn't on," Transportation Secretary Mary E. Peters said in announcing the findings. "Whatever it takes, we all need to do a better job making sure everyone chooses to buckle up" to help reduce rising highway fatalities.

The study gave Western states the highest marks, with usage in that region increasing from 85 percent to 90 percent in the past year.

Seat-belt use in the South edged up from 82 percent in 2005 to 83 percent this year. But it fell from 78 percent to 74 percent in the Northeast and from 79 percent to 77 percent in the Midwest during the same 12-month period, the report showed.

Data released in August by the department's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration revealed that 43,443 persons died in traffic accidents in the United States in 2005. It was the highest level in 15 years and 1.4 percent ahead of 2004, according to NHTSA.

Maryland is one of 24 states, along with the District of Columbia, that have so-called primary-prevention seat-belt laws, which allows drivers to be pulled over and ticketed solely because they are not wearing a safety belt.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

More Click It with Threat of a Ticket; 81% Wear Seat Belts in U.S.; Higher Usage Where Buckling Up Is Law
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?