Visiting Sites Associated with the Life of Franklin D. Roosevelt

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 26, 2006 | Go to article overview

Visiting Sites Associated with the Life of Franklin D. Roosevelt


Byline: Madelyn Merwin

Q. I am a student of Franklin D. Roosevelt and would like to know more about his homes, with the intent of visiting them. I have already been to the home at Hyde Park, N.Y., but need information on the others. I will be driving on these trips.

A. Visits to FDR's other residences will take you north to Canada and south to Georgia.

First, let's visit his "Little White House" at Warm Springs, Ga. The house, surprisingly modest, was built on the grounds of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, which was founded by Roosevelt who in 1921 had been stricken with polio that crippled his legs. He often swam there in the warm water of the springs.

Among items of interest at the house are FDR's 1937 Ford convertible sedan equipped with hand controls that enabled him to drive it (no automatic transmission), and an unfinished portrait that was being painted of him at the time of his death at the "Little White House" on April 12, 1945. He was buried three days later on the grounds of the Hyde Park residence.

There's a ton of information on FDR at www.warmspringsga.ws or by calling (800) 337-1927.

As to Campobello, you will find it just a little north of most of New England, but a little east of Maine, in New Brunswick, Canada. You can drive to the island from Lubec, Maine, over the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial Bridge. Keep in mind that Campobello is in Canada and you must have your birth certificate and a photo ID with you. A passport will be required as early as Jan. 1, 2008, for travelers to Canada by car. …

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