Showbiz Sam; Sam

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), December 9, 2006 | Go to article overview

Showbiz Sam; Sam


Q No-one I've asked can remember this TV comedy series. It was American and the main character was a Private Will Stockdale. He had a bloodhound and they sat on the veranda together. He was always being put in jail but could squeeze out through the bars and get back before anyone knew he was missing. Can you help? Linda Cruse, Falkirk

A The original No Time For Sergeants was a one-hour black and white TV live-broadcast drama starring Andy Griffiths. It was based on the hilarious novel by Mac Hyman about a Hillbilly recruited into the US Air Force. This play went on to spawn a Broadway play (script by Ira Levin), feature film (1958) and TV series (34 x 25-minute episodes in 1964) of the same name all starring Griffith.

Q My husband and I always closed our letters with "PS I love you". Who sang that song so long ago, I think that it might have been Patti Page? Joan Bruce, Port Seton

A It was written in 1934 by Gordon Jenkins and Johnny Mercer. You're probably thinking of the version by Cyril Stapleton and his Orchestra, vocal Pearl Carr. You could also try Lew Stone and his band, vocal Alan Kane, or Gordon Jenkins and his Orchestra, vocal Don Burke

Q Mary Steenburgen starred in a Christmas film a while back - can you tell me the title? Rena, Livingston

A One Magic Christmas (1985) was the story of an angel who interfered in the lives of a family with problems. Gary Basaraba and Harry Dean Stanton co-starred. In was a poor man's version of It's A Wonderful Life (1946) which will (fingers crossed) reappear on our TV screens over Christmas.

Q My daughter will be 50 on December 14. What was number one when she was born in 1956? Margaret Lockhart, Larkhall

A It was week number five of an amazing seven-week run for Johnnie Ray with Just Walkin' In The Rain.

Q One of the highlights of my childhood was being taken by my late dad to see Laurel and Hardy at the Glasgow Empire when I was little in the mid-50s. When might that have been? Frank Little, Motherwell

A The duo included Glasgow in both of their last two visits to the UK. They packed out the Empire from March 10-15, 1952 and on March 1, 1954.

Q The other night I was singing The Black Hills Of Dakota. Was it from a film? Margaret Smith, Irvine

A It was written by Sammy Fain and Paul Frances Webster for the 1953 classic movie Calamity Jane and sung by Dors Day.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Showbiz Sam; Sam
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.