Scorecard: Who Won and Who Lost on Election Day

By Burke, Daniel; Cho, Rebecca U. et al. | The Christian Century, November 28, 2006 | Go to article overview

Scorecard: Who Won and Who Lost on Election Day


Burke, Daniel, Cho, Rebecca U., Roshangar, Keith, The Christian Century


Efforts by Democratic candidates to display their faith and connect with religious voters helped produce huge electoral wins in Pennsylvania and Ohio, according to analysts and independent pollsters.

While the national voting patterns of religious Americans were not significantly different from the last midterm elections, Democrats turned the tide among white evangelicals and Catholics in both states, according to John Green, a senior fellow at the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life.

Bob Casey, the Pennsylvania Democrat who trounced Republican senator Rick Santorum, was supported by 58 percent of Catholic voters. "That's a pretty dramatic change" from previous elections, Green said.

In both states, Democrats fielded candidates who could challenge the Republican dominance on moral values. Ted Strickland, an ordained Methodist minister elected governor in Ohio, and Casey, an antiabortion Catholic, are not typical Democrats. But in winning by large margins, they possibly laid out a new path to victory for their party.

Across the rest of the country--in ballot initiatives and local races--there were other big winners and losers:

OHIO GOVERNOR

Who Wins: Religious Progressives

With an intensive outreach to religious voters, Democrat Ted Strickland made huge gains among Catholics and evangelicals and trounced an outspoken religious conservative in his race for governor.

Strickland, an ordained Methodist minister, was able to draw voters away from his Republican opponent, Ken Blackwell, by emphasizing "lunch bucket" moral issues like poverty and the environment, said Mara Vanderslice, a Strickland campaign adviser. "We changed the conversation about moral values," Vanderslice said. "It was impossible for it to be only about abortion and gay marriage."

The challenge for Democrats, observers say, is to keep that momentum and repeat this winning strategy in the 2008 elections and beyond.

MINIMUM WAGE

Who Wins: Religious Progressives

Religious progressives who hope to make the fight against poverty a galvanizing get-to-the-polls issue were encouraged by the voting, in which measures to raise the minimum wage passed in each of the six states where they were on the ballot.

"We succeeded in making this issue the 'values' issue of the 2006 election," said Paul Sherry, a minister who is national director of the Let Justice Roll Living Wage Campaign.

Thanks to barnstorming efforts by prominent preachers and local organizations, religious progressives succeeded in raising the minimum-wage and helped prove that poverty is the kind of issue that can draw voters from across theological and political lines, Sherry said.

In the 2008 elections and beyond, antipoverty and minimum wage measures could "bring out voters who care about jobs and values just as the gay marriage initiatives brought out conservative Christians," said Jim Wallis, a progressive author and activist.

ABORTION AND STEM CELL RESEARCH

Who Loses: Religious Conservatives

Two ballot measures--abortion in South Dakota and stem cell research in Missouri--drew the attention, and the dollars, of religious conservatives from across the U.S. They lost both battles.

South Dakota voters rejected a sweeping ban on abortion that would have outlawed the procedure unless it is necessary to save a mother's life. Had the measure passed, it could have sparked similar legislation in other states, said Carlton Veazey, president of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. Daniel McConchie, vice president of Americans United for Life, said conservatives will continue to try to chip away at legalized abortion through parental notification and informed-consent laws.

In Missouri, voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment that allows patients and researchers access to any method of stem cell research, therapy or cure permitted under federal law.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Scorecard: Who Won and Who Lost on Election Day
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.