German History after the Holocaust; Museums Mirror Strong Cultural Identity

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 14, 2006 | Go to article overview

German History after the Holocaust; Museums Mirror Strong Cultural Identity


Byline: Suzanne Fields, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

BERLIN - A choir from a suburban Chicago high school came to the Jewish Museum in Berlin not long ago to sing in commemoration of the 68th anniversary of Kristallnacht ("the Night of Broken Glass"), recalling the pogrom in 1938 when the Nazis broke into houses and stores, destroyed more than a 1,000 synagogues, murdered 91 Jews and arrested more than 30,000 Jewish men. It was a brutal foreshadowing of the Holocaust to come.

The Chicago teen-agers sang songs in Yiddish, Hebrew and English interspersed with narrated recollections of Jews who survived the Holocaust, talking of their lives and losses. Beautiful young voices soared on hymns and spirituals from slave times, powerful modern protests against prejudice old and new. German schoolchildren peppered the Americans with questions in a lively dialogue after the singing.

The German hosts described the occasion as "sensitive and evocative," but one of them told the American teacher who accompanied the choir that it was too bad that the kids hadn't taken note of another important anniversary that fell on the anniversary of Kristallnacht. Nov. 9-10 marked the 17th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. The visiting teacher conceded ruefully that he had been unaware of all that.

These bright and earnest Americans had studied minute details of anti-Semitism in Germany during the decades of the '30s and '40s, but were ignorant of the history of Germany in the years after the war, of the yearning for freedom that led ordinary people to confront Communist tyranny and that eventually led to the tumbling of the wall.

How unfortunate that classroom time is rarely given to the history of a divided Germany before the Iron Curtain finally collapsed. All over Berlin tourists are reminded of the fate of the six million Jews who died in Hitler's "final solution." But the grim history of Soviet tyranny in East Germany and specifically in East Berlin is only now getting the tourist attention it deserves as many German museums have begun to document life in the police state from 1949 to 1989.

A Wall Museum exposes the chilling effects on Berliners on both sides of the wall as well as those murdered trying to escape from East Germany. After the wall fell, the Germans planned a permanent exhibition of 2,000 years of their history, to replace a tawdry East Berlin museum whose mission was to guide the German Democratic Republic toward a national identity shaped by the "virtues" of socialism. …

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