On Your Bike Beeb

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 16, 2006 | Go to article overview

On Your Bike Beeb


Byline: By Carolyn Hitt

Just when you thought the BBC no longer used The Sally Gunnell Guide to Completely Stupid Questions, Adrian Chiles proved inane sports interviews are still in vogue.

In BBC Sports Personality of the Year, could the chubby Brummie have posed a more ridiculous query to Nicole Cooke than, 'What's it like to fall off your bike?'

If a female presenter had stuck a mic under Lance Armstrong's nose and asked the same question, there would have been uproar.

Mind you, there was uproar in my house. Last Sunday night, my mother was on the phone every 10 minutes fuming, 'They're not showing anything Nicole's done!' Course not. They were too busy showing Zara: The Movie, a compelling tale of royalty, water jumps and mucking out.

Gymnast Beth Tweddle didn't even have to rely on an arty-farty film package for promotion. She was allowed to perform an entire routine of swings and saltos on the asymmetric bars live in the studio.

It's always more difficult for a sportswoman than sportsman to capture the public imagination at these events but Tweddle and Phillips were given fantastic PR by the Beeb.

Not that they didn't deserve the coverage. Both excelled this year, even if no one in Britain, apart from Clare Balding, would be able to name the world three-day event champion if she wasn't the Queen's grand-daughter.

But Cooke also had an incredible year. And she must be wondering what - short of racing her bike across the desk of the BBC head of sport - she has to do to get some attention. The worst of it is Cooke wasn't so much showcased by BBC Sports Personality of the Year as shafted.

The flippancy of the questions belittled her achievement rather than celebrated it.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

On Your Bike Beeb
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.