Reinforcing the Link between Contributions and Pensions: The Effect of the Population Aging

By Lacomba, Juan A.; Lagos, Francisco | International Advances in Economic Research, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Reinforcing the Link between Contributions and Pensions: The Effect of the Population Aging


Lacomba, Juan A., Lagos, Francisco, International Advances in Economic Research


Abstract

In this paper, we analyze a majority voting process on the earnings-related part of pension benefits in a Social Security system with flexible retirement. We show that the aging of the population may make it easier to implement one of the proposed reforms to achieve a delay in the average retirement age of workers, to reinforce the link between contributions and pensions. (JEL H55, J26)

Keywords Social Security, aging, flexible retirement, earnings-related pensions

Introduction

Unless serious changes take place, the aging of the population implying a rise in the number of retirees relative to that of workers will threaten the viability of Pay-As-You-Go public pension systems in the long run. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that pension systems in virtually all OECD countries in the mid-1990s made it financially unattractive to work after the age of 55 [Blondal and Scarpetta, 1999; Gruber and Wise, 1997]. The reason is that after the earliest age at which pensions can be accessed, the costs of postponing retirement (paying contributions for an additional year and foregoing one year of pensions, provided that pensions will be paid out only after leaving the labour force) are higher than the gains (increasing the pension benefits per year). That is, the pension system is implicitly taxing to prolong the working period and then becomes a clear incentive to retire early.

So, in order to solve future financing problems, most Social Security reforms aim to reduce the disincentives to continue working and to delay the retirement age. Two of these economic policy measures are to allow greater flexibility in the retirement decision and to reinforce the link between lifetime contributions and pension benefits (e.g., Germany, Italy, and Sweden). In point of fact, these two measures are part of the policy conclusions of the OECD project The Retirement Decision in OECD Countries, [Blondal and Scarpetta, 1999: p. 8]: "the most appropriate reform would be to allow people to retire at the age of their own choice and to adjust pension levels so that the pension system is neutral on average." The pension system will be neutral when the raise in pensions due to a further year of work makes up for an additional year of pension contributions and for delaying the receipt of pensions by one year removing the incentives to early retirement. But reinforcing the link between life-contributions and pension benefits might imply a reduction in the redistribution from high-wage workers to low-wage workers, and this fact may lead to an excessive degree of compulsion.

Based on Casamatta et al. [2005] two overlapping generations model, we consider a Pay-As-You-Go Social Security system where people can retire at the age of their own choice. (1) Those retiring early receive a lower pension, while those retiring later have a higher pension. Unlike Casamatta et al. [2005], we assume that pension benefits are paid out only after leaving the labour force and the contribution tax rate is given. (2) As such, we focus our attention on the main aspect of the problem of the implicit tax on postponing retirement, the link between lifetime contributions and pension benefits. We introduce a retirement formula consisting of an earnings-related part and of a uniform one. To analyze the extent to which the link between lifetime contributions and retirement benefits can be reinforced, we consider the earnings-related part to be endogenously determined. So, the population chooses the intra-generational redistribution level of the pension system through a majority voting process.

We show that with flexible retirement, population aging may lead to a reduction in the redistribution within generations, implying a lower implicit tax on postponing retirement. This result suggests that to combine neutrality with flexibility in a population-aging context may ease the introduction of such reforms.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reinforcing the Link between Contributions and Pensions: The Effect of the Population Aging
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.