Hate Acts against Muslims Decline; Crimes against Jews Highestz

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 25, 2006 | Go to article overview

Hate Acts against Muslims Decline; Crimes against Jews Highestz


Byline: Audrey Hudson, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

"Hate crimes" reported by Muslims have decreased significantly since the year of the September 11 terrorist attacks, according to the FBI, and harassment against Jews outnumber incidents against all other religious and ethnic groups.

Hate crimes and harassment against Jews far outnumber those against any other religion, including Muslims, according to new hate-crime statistics reported from 2000 through 2005.

Nearly 1,700 hate crimes against Jews were reported in 2000 and 2,118 in 2001, a significant spike that was similarly reflected in crimes reported against Muslims. Thirty-six hate crimes against Muslims were reported in 2000 and more than 500 in 2001 most of them after the Islamist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, in which more than 3,000 Americans, including some Muslims, died.

The numbers dropped to 977 hate crimes against Jews and 151 hate crimes against Muslims in 2005, according to the most recent FBI numbers.

The preponderance of harassment of Jews doesn't surprise Dr. M. Zuhdi Jasser, a Phoenix physician and chairman of the American Islamic Forum for Democracy, who says anti-Semitism "has had hundreds of years of roots" in European countries and over the past century in the U.S. He predicts that "over the next 100 years, we will see the establishment of Islamophobia taking root. It is still a relatively new phenomenon, but at an accelerated fashion."

Abraham H. Foxman, director of the Anti-Defamation League, says the FBI figures are encouraging, "[but] we remain concerned because too many people continue to act out their anti-Jewish hatred."

"We have always said that America is different, that the Jewish communities here are fortunate to be largely immune from the kind of anti-Semitic violence experienced by some European Jewish communities," he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hate Acts against Muslims Decline; Crimes against Jews Highestz
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.