Amelia Theater Looking to State; the Playhouse Is among Groups Hopeful for Cash from Florida's Legislature

By Apollo, Anne Marie | The Florida Times Union, December 4, 2006 | Go to article overview

Amelia Theater Looking to State; the Playhouse Is among Groups Hopeful for Cash from Florida's Legislature


Apollo, Anne Marie, The Florida Times Union


Byline: ANNE MARIE APOLLO

Now, 25 years after its first production, the theater is poised to hit the big time.

The playhouse is one of five arts institutions in four counties in Northeast Florida in line for a share of $21.7 million in state cultural facilities grants. The Florida Arts Council listed 50 projects, ranked by priority, and included three of the five local projects in the top 15.

Until the Legislature votes, there is no way of knowing how many of the projects will get money, if any. Last year's list was funded in its entirety.

Topping the list is a grant to The Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens for the second phase of a project to cover its courtyard. The second phase of a Jacksonville Zoo botanical garden project ranked third. Both are recommended to get $500,000 grants, a repeat feat for the Jacksonville landmarks.

Each was awarded a cultural facilities grant in the last round of state funding, with the Cummer getting $500,000 to expand its women's club and the zoo receiving the same amount for the first phase of its botanical garden.

At No. 28 on the list, the St. Johns County Cultural Council was recommended to receive $495,160 for a renovation of the cultural arts center at St. Augustine Beach. Green Cove Springs came in at No. 40.

It's looking for $112,000 for the renovation of the T.R. Marie Arts & Cultural Center at Augusta Savage Square.

The Amelia Community Theatre is tied for 13th place in the rankings. That's high enough for its leadership to hope to break ground on the new building in the fall.

A capital campaign already has brought in $800,000. If the $500,000 in state money comes through, Graham Thomas, the theater's chairman of the expansion project, estimates it will need an additional $300,000 to $500,000 to complete the work.

The expansion has been in the works for years, said theater director and founding member Linda McClane.

The theater moved into its existing quarters in the late 1980s, retrofitting the old offices of the Nassau County School Board to an intimate space that seats about 80.

Later, the theater bought land around the building, its supporters dreaming of the things often seen as basic for a production - good acoustics, comfier chairs or a stage with wings.

Now it looks forward to getting all of those things and doubling the size of the audience. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Amelia Theater Looking to State; the Playhouse Is among Groups Hopeful for Cash from Florida's Legislature
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.