Preschool Annotated Bibliography

By Cleland, Fran | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, August 1994 | Go to article overview

Preschool Annotated Bibliography


Cleland, Fran, JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


This bibliography includes helpful information for movement specialists, early childhood educators, and parents.

Teachers responsible for the design, implementation, and evaluation of preschool movement experiences are encouraged to seek out not only the practical information provided within this bibliography, but also the philosophical insights provided by such authors as McLachlan-Smith, Monighan, and Smolucha. It is also important to note authors' descriptions of both the content and processes unique to teaching young children physical education (e.g., Buschner; Kruger & Kruger; Sanders). Several authors emphasize the significance of designing rich learning environments which engage children physically, cognitively, and socially. This magnifies a pervasive theme in preschool physical education; that is, engaging the "whole child."

Journal and Newsletter Articles

Andress, B. (1991). From research to practice: Preschool children and their movement responses to music. Young Children, 47(1), 22-27.

Andress, through a review of research conducted by Metz in 1986 on preschool children's movement responses to music, highlights the characteristics of young children (ages 2, 3, and 4) while engaged in music-movement activities, the role of the teacher, and the design of developmentally appropriate learning centers for the purpose of enhancing children's movement responses to music.

Booth, B.F., & Larock, R. (1986). Movement autonomy and the human environment: Three to six year old children. Physical Education Review, 9, 82-85.

The authors discuss the movement environment and the preoperational child (i.e., 3 to 6 years) and propose a set of principles which evolved from their movement research with young children. Suggestions for optimum groupings, instructional behavior, parental involvement, play and safety considerations, participation, and self-discipline are offered.

Brown, B., & Prideaux, R. (1988, July-October). Children with movement learning difficulties. A collaborative initiative with 4-5 year-old mainstreamed children and their parents. British Journal of Physical Education, 19, 186-189.

The authors describe the results and design of a collaborative approach (i.e., teachers, parents, support staff) for diagnosing, assessing, intervening, monitoring, and re-evaluating 4- and five-year-olds' movement skill behaviors. A justification for a "physical curriculum" within the overall preschool curriculum is provided and described using a developmental model. The link between early movement learning and movement experiences with children's motor development and their successful integration in playground, classroom, and movement settings is established.

Early childhood physical education. [Feature]. (1988, September). Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 59(7), 42-72.

This JOPERD feature highlights the significance of early movement experiences for children. Andrea Boucher's introduction describes both the environmental stimuli and pedagogical strategies which serve to encourage motor skill development and creative play among children. Additional articles describe the design and purpose of play structures, creative dance, exploration as a process for learning, manipulative activities, and the essential elements of a teacher education program designed to prepare early childhood physical educators.

Hanson, M.R. (1992, January/February). Physical educators must prepare for preschoolers in the public schools. Teaching Elementary Physical Education, 3(1), 1, 7.

Within this special newsletter feature, Hanson highlights current issues, educational needs, and programmatic concerns relevant to preschool children. Implications for physical educators are addressed.

Kelman, A. (1990, March). Choices for children. Young Children, 45(3), 42-45.

Kelman addresses the importance of providing choices (e.g, outdoor or indoor play; classroom activities) for children within the learning environment.

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