Americans Flunk Clinton 101; If Business Conditions and Job Growth Are as Robust as the White House Says They Are, Why Do Nearly Half of All Americans Disapprove of President Clinton's Handling of the Economy?

By Lambro, Donald | Insight on the News, August 1, 1994 | Go to article overview

Americans Flunk Clinton 101; If Business Conditions and Job Growth Are as Robust as the White House Says They Are, Why Do Nearly Half of All Americans Disapprove of President Clinton's Handling of the Economy?


Lambro, Donald, Insight on the News


With economic growth rising by a moderate 3.5 percent in the first quarter, unemployment falling to 6 percent and inflation remaining below 2.5 percent, the polls should show that a majority of Americans give the president good marks on the economy. Among all the problems he faces -- from Whitewater to a sexual harassment suit -- economics would seem to be his best issue. Yet nearly every poll shows that 48 percent or more of all Americans surveyed are critical of the state of the economy and the way Clinton is managing economic policy. During the first week of July, a Washington Post/ABC News poll found that 42 percent believe the economy will get worse, while 39 percent think it will improve.

The voters may be ahead of the economists and politicians in Washington, since there is growing evidence that the economy indeed is slowing down and will continue to do so for the remainder of this year and into the next -- a result of the combined braking effect of higher interest rates, tax increases and reduced consumer spending. The long-term outlook isn't much better. The president's Council of Economic Advisers has forecast that real growth will average around 2.6 percent a year for the remainder of this decade, significantly less than the 2.8 percent average growth rate of the 1980s.

"The economy's problems are evident in the current expansion, which has been weak and could soon end," says Robert Shapiro of the Democratic Leadership Council, who helped design Clinton's economic proposals during the 1992 campaign. "No one can be certain when the current expansion will naturally end, but it probably has at least four more quarters to go."

Political analysts say the president's poor scores on the economy are the result of a number of factors, including a growing fear among voters that their jobs will be affected. There's a sense of loss of security among workers about what's happening with the economy now and in the future," says Bruce Blakeman of the Wirthlin Group, a Republican polling company. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Americans Flunk Clinton 101; If Business Conditions and Job Growth Are as Robust as the White House Says They Are, Why Do Nearly Half of All Americans Disapprove of President Clinton's Handling of the Economy?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.