Seeds of Change: Buying Black Farm Products Enriches the Health and Wealth of Our Community

By Smart, Maya Payne | Black Enterprise, January 2007 | Go to article overview
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Seeds of Change: Buying Black Farm Products Enriches the Health and Wealth of Our Community


Smart, Maya Payne, Black Enterprise


DAVID ROACH LEARNED OF THE ECONOMIC CRISIC, FACING black farmers while studying business finance at Moreh0use College, but years later its far-reaching consequences hit him hard when he saw one of his high school students feeding her young child candy.

The experience led him to found The Familyhood Connection, an Oakland, California-based nonprofit organization in 1994. Today, the organization's Mo' Better Food Healthy Economics Campaign (www.mobetterfood.com) educates black consumers about nutrition and agriculture, and helps black farmers distribute their products to local schools, stores, and restaurants.

Independent, family-owned farming has been a vital earnings source for many black families, and its produce could address the shortage of fresh fruits and vegetables plaguing many urban communities. Strengthening black farming could also generate jobs in other areas of the food industry from planting and packaging to distribution and store ownership.

"If our communities don't participate [in the food system], we're going to continue to be fed inferior foods at high prices," Roach says. "We're going to miss out on jobs that relate to the food industry, unemployment will continue at alarming rates, and our communities will continue to see empty storefronts that could actually be grocery stores owned by African Americans."

But what can consumers do to help? For starters, we can make a conscious effort to seek out black farmers and add their products to our diets. Mo' Better Food runs a weekly farmers market in West Oakland and plans to open retail stores in April to give the neighborhood regular access to fresh foods.

The truth is black farmers are increasingly hard to come by. America's 29,090 principal black farm operators represent only 1.4% of all U.S. principal farm operators. Jerry Pennick, director of the Federation of Southern Cooperatives' Land Assistance Fund, says that the black community must begin to look at land ownership as the key to economic development and independence before it's too late.

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