Reducing Violent Crime through Prevention, Intervention, Treatment

By Lehman, Joseph D. | Corrections Today, August 1994 | Go to article overview

Reducing Violent Crime through Prevention, Intervention, Treatment


Lehman, Joseph D., Corrections Today


Stemming the Violence

The theme of this issue--"Stemming the Violence"--could not be more timely. Those of us who work in corrections see day in and day out the tragic consequences of violence and its effect on the lives of victims, offenders, their families, the community and society. Notwithstanding the statistical measure of its prevalence or the hysteria that is created by the media's treatment of it, by any measure ours is a violent society.

This issue of Corrections Today gives us an opportunity to step back and deal with this important social problem. Surely with our experience in working with violent offenders in community settings and prisons, in controlling and treating their violent tendencies and in providing services to victims, we have learned something that will help us stem violence in our families, neighborhoods, schools, communities and prisons. It is that expertise and experience that this issue is intended to share.

This issue discusses violence prevention, intervention and treatment from a variety of perspectives. Although they often are considered distinct activities, these efforts should be viewed as interrelated. We can improve treatment based on what we learn through our efforts to prevent violent behavior and vice versa.

Our endeavors to control violence, in whatever setting, should be shaped similarly by what we know about treating violent behavior. …

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Reducing Violent Crime through Prevention, Intervention, Treatment
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