Gone, Never Forgotten from the Playing Fields to the Pain of Iraq; from Business and Politics to the Arts, We Bid Farewell in 2006

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 31, 2006 | Go to article overview

Gone, Never Forgotten from the Playing Fields to the Pain of Iraq; from Business and Politics to the Arts, We Bid Farewell in 2006


In 2006, we lost one of the most famous coaches in the history of collegiate athletics, and another one who died before his time.

We lost one of our young men to the battlefields of Iraq.

We said goodbye to one woman who helped push back the veil covering the AIDS crisis and another who fought tirelessly to allow girls the joy of playing competitive sports.

A businessman, an adventurer and a 105-year-old man who saw much, lived much and who poured his heart into his museum.

We lost public servants who tried to better their communities and a remarkable artist who saw the world through his opera- performing puppets.

We bid a fond farewell to a world-class writer and friend.

Here, then, is a final salute to some of the people who contributed to our world, and who passed in 2006.

They helped shape our communities

On a wider stage

Susan Bergman, 48, of Chicago and Barrington. Died Jan. 1. A poet and essayist, she authored the 1994 book "Anonymity," which detailed the trauma of dealing not only with her 45-year-old father's death in 1983, but the later discovery that he had died from AIDS and that he led an undetected life as a homosexual. Teacher and lecturer, she also edited an anthology called "Martyrs: Contemporary Writers on Modern Lives of Faith" and authored a second book, "Buried Life." Sister of actress Anne Heche.

Mayor Irwin A. Bock, 65, of Hanover Park. Died in office March 9. Mayor since 1997, re-elected without challenge in 2001 and 2005; plus three terms as village trustee. President of Northwest Municipal Conference; vice president of Illinois Municipal League. Volunteer firefighter with old Ontarioville Fire Protection District; later chaired DuComm, the DuPage County emergency dispatch agency. Professionally, spent 25 years with the Chicago Police Department. In late July, the new fire station at 6850 Barrington Road was dedicated in his honor.

Ola Bundy, 70, the First Lady of girls interscholastic athletics in Illinois, died Feb. 18. The first person inducted into the Illinois Girls Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 1987, she was an IHSA administrator since 1967 running GAA programs and building the case for interscholastic competition. After Title IX passed in 1972, she ran all the girls state tournaments by herself until 1975. Wrote the IHSA's affirmative action policy for girls playing in boys' state series; helped write the Illinois State Board of Education's sex equity rules. In 1996, enshrined in National High School Sports Hall of Fame in Florida.

Cpl. Ryan John Cummings, U.S. Marines, 22, of Streamwood and Crystal Lake, died June 3 on patrol with B Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines in Iraq. Awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Action Ribbon, Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, the Humanitarian Service Medal, the Iraq Campaign Medal, the Sea Service Deployment Ribbon and many more. A 2002 graduate of Hoffman Estates High School, he was an honor roll student, a musician in the concert and marching bands; and a wrestler.

George W. Dunne, longtime Cook County Board president, died May 28 at 93. President 1969-1990, he built the Cook County courthouses in Rolling Meadows, Skokie and Maywood; had role in creating Busse Lake. Known for answering his own phone, built a life in politics: In 1955 elected to the Illinois House; in 1962 elected to the Cook County Board. Wielded considerable power as committeeman of the 42nd Ward for more than 40 years and as chairman of the Cook County Democratic Party, a post he took after Richard J. Daley died.

William Fosser, 78, founder of Opera in Focus puppet opera, known nationally and headquartered in Rolling Meadows. …

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Gone, Never Forgotten from the Playing Fields to the Pain of Iraq; from Business and Politics to the Arts, We Bid Farewell in 2006
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