Where's the Outrage? CPJ Report Calls Murder of Immigrant Journalists Terrorism, but U.S. Law Enforcement and Press Remain Indifferent

By Hernandez, Debra Gersh | Editor & Publisher, August 13, 1994 | Go to article overview

Where's the Outrage? CPJ Report Calls Murder of Immigrant Journalists Terrorism, but U.S. Law Enforcement and Press Remain Indifferent


Hernandez, Debra Gersh, Editor & Publisher


TERRORIST ACTS HAVE been committed on U.S. soil but have gone unsolved and have received scant media attention, a new report says.

Between 1981 and 1993, 10 foreign-language journalists working in the United States were murdered, eight of them in political assassinations, according to a report from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

Previewed during a National Association of Hispanic journalists panel discussion at the Unity '94 convention in Atlanta, the CPJ report, slated for a September release, says it has established "new leads and details in many of these cases" and has documented "in almost all cases that local and national law enforcement authorities are not vigorously investigating these crimes."

A summary of the report says the cases "are likely to remain unsolved" unless the news media spotlight "the apparent unwillingness of law enforcement officials to devote their resources to these attacks,"

The assassinations included five Vietnamese journalists and three Haitians, the study said.

"These journalists had fled repression and turmoil in their native countries only to find death in America for openly expressing their political views," CPJ noted. "In each case, the crimes appeared to have been intended to intimidate or silence dissident voices within these communities'

CPJ uncovered four disturbing patterns:

* Unlike the highly publicized murder case of Manuel de Dios Unanue in New York City, which resulted in arrests and convictions, most of the other killings remain unsolved and have received scant media attention.

* The journalists or their news organizations received "ideologically-motivated threats or other harassment" prior to the murders.

* Most of the murders were treated as local crimes, despite "strong indications that these were political assassinations with national and possibly international implications." Some accounts in the mainstream media intimated "obscure reasons at play, indicating perhaps the journalists were not only press people but were involved in criminal activities as well."

* If the U.S. Department of Justice were willing to allocate the necessary budgets and resources, the crimes could be solved, law enforcement sources told CPJ, but neither Congress nor the press appears interested.

CPJ says it found a double standard: the timely solving of murders of immigrant journalists from ethnic communities too large to ignore and of American journalists, compared with the unsolved murders of journalists from smaller communities, many of whom have only recently fled homelands where speaking out is dangerous.

For example, the 1984 murder of American radio talk-show host Alan Berg led to a nationwide FBI investigation and the arrest and conviction of two white supremacists.

Also in 1984, the murder of Henry Liu in San Francisco by assasins working for the Taiwanese military was quickly dispatched, both because it involved espionage affecting American national security and because the area's Chinese-American population is too large to be ignored, according to CPJ.

The de Dios case also was solved, according to CPJ, because Drug Enforcement Agency officials were eager to prosecute Colombia's Cali drug cartel and, again, because New York's His, panic population wields power.

The murders have had a chilling effect on the press, the report says: Haitian radio commentators have refrained from criticizing the military regime in Haiti. Vietnamese-language newspapers have avoided taking clear positions on U.S. trade and diplomatic relations. Latino journalists are hesitant to report on the drug trade.

CPJ executive director William A. Orme Jr., who met briefly with Attorney General Janet Reno, told the Unity audience that the justice Department is aware of the situation, but little is being done.

"The non-english-language press has always been a part of the American press, and it has the same First Amendment rights," Orme said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Where's the Outrage? CPJ Report Calls Murder of Immigrant Journalists Terrorism, but U.S. Law Enforcement and Press Remain Indifferent
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.