Leading Companies Turn to Trade Associations for Lobbying

By Bovet, Susan Fry | Public Relations Journal, August-September 1994 | Go to article overview

Leading Companies Turn to Trade Associations for Lobbying


Bovet, Susan Fry, Public Relations Journal


A recent survey showed that a sampling of FORTUNE 100 companies are widely engaged in organizing and supervising coalition building, which usually involves lobbying activities. These companies tend to rely heavily upon trade associations and consultants to conduct coalition activities. Executives at the companies responding to the survey also predicted that coalition-building activity would increase in the next five to ten years. These were among the major findings of The Pires Report on Coalition Activity Among the FORTUNE 100, a 50-page publication commissioned by The Pires Group, Inc., in Ardsley, NY, and issued this past spring.

The report is based on data collected by William J. Sauer, Ph.D., and James D.Sodt, Ph.D., of Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, PA, from 30 corporations. Respondents were involved in an average of 5.7 coalitions. The majority of these were formed for legislative and regulatory purposes and focused primarily on national issues, such as health care reform, legal/tax reform and the environment.

"This research bears out our client experience that coalitions are used both proactively and reactively by business," said Pires, whose firm specializes in alliance building and coalitions. "It clearly reflects a widespread acceptance of coalitions ... on the part of America's largest companies [but]... raises some questions about the depth of individual company involvement in these alliances... The companies surveyed currently prefer to work within the context of their own intra-industry associations, both to avoid perceived risk and to husband internal resources," she noted.

More than one-third of the respondent companies reported spending over $1 million per year on coalition activity, the research showed. This level is modest, since FORTUNE 100 companies have annual sales of $5 billion or more. The majority of respondents saw coalition building as requiring much more effort over the next five to ten years, but only half predicted that their spending on coalition resources would increase.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Leading Companies Turn to Trade Associations for Lobbying
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.