President Clinton Signs Interstate Bill into Law, Saying It's a First Step

By Garsson, Robert M. | American Banker, September 30, 1994 | Go to article overview

President Clinton Signs Interstate Bill into Law, Saying It's a First Step


Garsson, Robert M., American Banker


WASHINGTON -- President Clinton signed the interstate branching bill into law Thursday, flanked by two bankers who praised him for attacking what they described as outmoded banking laws.

"You recognize that the world is changing and laws passed in the 1920s don't work anymore," said Norwest Corp. chairman Richard M. Kovacevich.

Chase Manhattan Corp. chairman Thomas Labrecque said the bill, along with legislation implemenling new trade treaties, "shows a sustained commitment to make. the United States more competitive and effective in the global economy."

For his part, the President highlighted the measure as part of his continuing effort "to reinvent government," and promised more banking legislation to come.

"Our work is far from over," he told a group of lobbyists, regulators, lawmakers, and congressional aides who assembled for the ceremony in the Department of Treasury's ornate Cash Room.

The interstate branching bill, represents a significant victory for the banking industry and particularly for the trade groups and big banks that kept the bill alive when it appeared hopeless.

Moreover, the bill was kept "clean" free of the restrictions banks feared tlley would be saddled with. Of particular concern was an amendment restricting bank insurance powers and a measure expanding Community Reinvestment Act requirements. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

President Clinton Signs Interstate Bill into Law, Saying It's a First Step
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.