In Memoriam: Lt. Gen. Lawrence F. Skibbie, USA (Ret.), President Emeritus, National Defense Industrial Association

National Defense, January 2007 | Go to article overview

In Memoriam: Lt. Gen. Lawrence F. Skibbie, USA (Ret.), President Emeritus, National Defense Industrial Association


Lt. Gen. Lawrence F. Skibbie, U.S. Army ret., president emeritus of the National Defense Industrial Association, died December 10 following a long illness.

Gen. Skibbie was appointed president and chief executive officer of the National Defense Industrial Association at its founding March 1, 1997.

NDIA is the result of a merger between the American Defense Preparedness Association, which Gen. Skibbie headed, and the National Security Industrial Association. The amalgamation of these two defense industry associations was largely due to Gen. Skibbie's efforts.

Since his retirement from NDIA in September 2001, he had served as volunteer vice president of the National Military Family Association, which advocates for military families.

In his capacity as ADPA president, Gen. Skibbie re-oriented the association to its historic roots as the proponent of a strong defense industrial base. Through his leadership, ADPA became known as the "Voice of the Industrial Base." AS president of NDIA, he committed to consolidating the defense association community and establishing NDIA as the preeminent defense association.

At his retirement NDIA had three affiliated associations as its partners: the National Training Systems Association, the Association for Enterprise Integration and Women in Defense.

In his honor, the National Defense Industrial Association in 2001 created the Lawrence F. Skibbie Graduate Student Scholarship, which awards up to $10,000 to one or more advanced graduate students in engineering, science or management. So far, at least 10 students have received scholarships.

Gen. Skibbie lectured at the Financial Post Conference of Canada, the Mitre Acquisition Conference, the Brookings Institution, the Defense Systems Management College, the Virginia Defense Conversion Commission and the U.S. Army War College. He also was a frequent witness before both houses of Congress on matters pertaining to the defense industrial base.

Gen. Skibbie served on the boards of Codar Technology Company, Contraves USA, United Way, Boy Scouts of America, National Science Center and the Easter Seal Society. He was an associate of the NSC Global Policy Council, The Washington Institute of Foreign Affairs, served on the board of SERCO Inc., and was a long-time member of the Army-Navy Club.

He was born in Bowling Green, Ohio, February 16, 1932, and graduated

from the United States Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. in 1954 as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army. He received a Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from New Mexico State University. His military education included the Artillery School, Ordnance School, Command and General Staff College and Industrial College of the Armed Forces. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In Memoriam: Lt. Gen. Lawrence F. Skibbie, USA (Ret.), President Emeritus, National Defense Industrial Association
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.