Round & About: January 2007

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Round & About: January 2007


The Making of Modern London, c. 1660-2000

January 8th

Museum of London

London EC2Y 5HN

Tel: 0870 444 3850

www.museumoflondon.org.uk

This twenty-four week course in association with Birkbeck College asks the question 'how did London come to achieve its present form?' Among the subjects considered are the development of the West End, varieties in trade and commerce, Victorian social surveys and the development of the railways.

Barbed Wit: Italian Satire of the Great War

January 10th-March 18th

Estorick Collection

39a Canonbury Square

London N11 2AN

Tel: 020 7704 9522

www.estorickcollection.com

Organized in conjunction with the Imperial War Museum, this exhibition showcases a unique collection of Italian postcards from the First World War. Thirty-six original designs are on display, each reflecting different Italian opinions on various aspects of the GreatWar and the countries involved.

The River Thames in London's History

January 10th

Museum in Docklands

150 London Wall, London EC2Y 5HN

Tel: 0870 444 3856

www.museumindocklands.org.uk

A twelve-week course focusing on the influence of the Thames on the development of London from AD 50 to the present, and drawing on the unique resources of the Museum in Docklands to explore a variety of themes.

Form's Duthchas: Land and Legacy

January 13th-March 17th

Inverness Museum and Art Gallery

Castle Wynd, Inverness IV2 3EB

Tel: 01463 237114

www.fonnsduthchas.com

This major exhibition will tour Scotland throughout 2007, starting at the Inverness Museum and Art Gallery before moving on to Glasgow, Edinburgh and Stornoway later in the year. Exploring the roots and development of Highland culture, 'Fonn's Duthchas' takes in a number of themes ranging from 'the oral tradition and the resurgence of traditional language' to 'the Highland landscape and its effect upon its people'. The exhibition also looks at how the population of the Highlands has changed since the days of the Viking invaders, whilst displaying important historical documents from Sir Walter Scott, James Macpherson and artefacts associated with Culloden and the Clearances.

Canaletto in England: A Venetian Artist Abroad, 1746-1755

24th January-April 15th

Dulwich Picture Gallery

Gallery Road,

London SE21 7AD

Tel: 020 8693 5254

www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk

The nine years that Canaletto spent in England is marked here with a special exhibition of over fifty paintings and thirty drawings. The contrast Canaletto found in London, compared to his native Venice, fascinated the artist and he produced a number of panoramic views of the capital. Images frequently focus on the River Thames but also explore London's parks, skyline and ancient buildings.

The Art of Conversation

Until January 15th

York Art Gallery

Exhibition Square, York YO1 7EW

Tel: 01904 687687

www.york.trust.museum

Works from artists including Gainsborough, Stubbs and Devis are on display in this exhibition, which benefits from a number of major loans to complement the York Art Gallery's own collection. The exhibition combines decorative and fine arts from the 18th century with costumes from the same period.

Greenwich Time Clocks that Changed the World

January 16th, 6.30pm

National Maritime Museum

Park Row, Greenwich

London SE10 9NF

Tel: 020 8858 4422

www.nmm.ac.uk

An illustrated lecture from David Rooney, Curator of Timekeeping at the Royal Observatory, investigating the role of the Royal Observatory in the measurement and distribution of accurate time from the 17th century till the present day. …

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