The Dream Still a Dream, King's Daughter Laments; Yolanda King Speaks at the Willie E. Gary/Martin Luther King Jr. Luncheon

By Kerr, Jessie-Lynne | The Florida Times Union, January 10, 2007 | Go to article overview

The Dream Still a Dream, King's Daughter Laments; Yolanda King Speaks at the Willie E. Gary/Martin Luther King Jr. Luncheon


Kerr, Jessie-Lynne, The Florida Times Union


Byline: JESSIE-LYNNE KERR

Six days before the 21st observance of the national holiday honoring her father, the eldest child of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. urged a Jacksonville audience Tuesday to "get up off your apathy" and keep working to make the slain civil rights leader's dream of equality a reality.

Yolanda King, an actress, author and orator who champions personal growth and positive social change, was the featured speaker at the Willie E. Gary/Martin Luther King Jr. luncheon held at the Be-The-Lite Conference Center.

She was the fourth member of her family to speak at the annual gathering. Her sister, Bernice King, spoke here last year, and their mother, the late Coretta Scott King, spoke in 2005. Her brother, Martin Luther King III, was the speaker in 2004.

King was introduced by Gary, the Stuart lawyer and philanthropist who said he never forgot those who toiled in the vegetable fields in which he labored as a youth.

Martin Luther King Jr., Gary told the audience of hundreds, was a man "who really made a difference in the lives of all of us. We are the fruits of his labors."

But Gary chided those who get smug with their own success and fail to reach back with a helping hand.

"Yolanda King," he said, "has never forgotten about the bridge that brought her over."

Had her father not been slain nearly 39 years ago, he would have celebrated his 78th birthday this year.

This year also marks 43 years since King spent a night in the Duval County jail, where he was moved for his own protection after being arrested in St. Augustine during a civil rights demonstration.

"People who are 38 years old or younger weren't born when Martin Luther King walked among us," King noted, and to some who were, "it all seems like misty images."

But, she assured her listeners, "it was live and in living color."

King the actress took over for a bit as she performed monologues portraying Dorrie, a girl in Montgomery, Ala. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Dream Still a Dream, King's Daughter Laments; Yolanda King Speaks at the Willie E. Gary/Martin Luther King Jr. Luncheon
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.