Crimewatch's Ross in Shock after Murder of Historian Pal Rattray 830 Great Enthusiast for South African History: Rattray and Ross

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 29, 2007 | Go to article overview

Crimewatch's Ross in Shock after Murder of Historian Pal Rattray 830 Great Enthusiast for South African History: Rattray and Ross


ONE MAN who is deeply shocked by the weekend murder of the Zulus' champion, the historian David Rattray, is Nick Ross, presenter of BBC's Crimewatch UK.

Ross met Rattray, a friend of Prince Charles, several times and was captivated by his enthusiasm for South African history and also stayed at his ranch at Fugitives' Drift overlooking the battlefield of Isandlwana where the Zulus humiliated the British in 1879.

"This is a real tragedy for South Africa because Rattray really shared Zulu culture and had a spellbinding ability to inspire groups of people with his enthusiasm," says Ross, who played a leading role in searching for the killer of his Crimewatch colleague Jill Dando. "It would be complete speculation for me to say, from a distance of several thousand miles, what happened, especially as early reports of crimes are often completely wrong.

"He was a good employer who brought in a lot of revenue but there are lots of different reasons why people might have got fed up with him. He was a brave man who would not have put up with any nonsense if there had been any trouble. …

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Crimewatch's Ross in Shock after Murder of Historian Pal Rattray 830 Great Enthusiast for South African History: Rattray and Ross
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