WAGS BOUTIQUE TEST; EXCLUSIVE Are TV Show's Footballers' Girls All Airheads? We Gave Them a Quiz to Find Out

The Mirror (London, England), February 26, 2007 | Go to article overview

WAGS BOUTIQUE TEST; EXCLUSIVE Are TV Show's Footballers' Girls All Airheads? We Gave Them a Quiz to Find Out


Byline: By BETH NEIL

THEY are no strangers to nattering over a long girlie lunch - but we bet the Second World War is a topic that rarely comes up in conversation.

And we can't imagine they ever chew the fat about Wuthering Heights either.

So this is a pub lunch with a difference for four stars of ITV2's WAGs Boutique - Charlotte Mears (who turned up nearly two hours late), Heather Swan, Madeleine Bowden and Elle Isaac.

The TV show features two teams of footballers' other halves who run rival boutiques to see who can make the most cash for charity.

The girls claim they agreed to appear on the show to dispel the myth that WAGs are a bunch of bimbos who spend all day shopping and guzzling champagne.

So when challenged to a quick quiz at Central London's Living Room, they're well up for it. Charlotte (Jermain Defoe's fiancee) gets the girls off to a flier by answering that England won the World Cup in 1966.

Elle (girlfriend of Crystal Palace's Paul Ifill) then correctly names Steve McClaren as the current England manager.

So far, so good. Though maybe they just know lots about football. What about politics?

Charlotte lets slip that she thought Margaret Thatcher was the queen. And her history's not much better.

"When was the Second World War?" she ponders. "Was it 1911?"

Er, final answer? "1852?" The girls collapse laughing. And it's down to Elle to inform Charlotte that the right answer is, of course, 1939 to 1945.

But Charlotte's not alone in her ditziness. When Maddy (girlfriend of Arsenal's Justin Hoyte) is asked the name of "the leader of the opposition" she asks which football team the question is referring to.

"Oh! The leader of the Tories?" she says, when told. "Erm..."

"I KNOW! I KNOW!" shouts an eager Charlotte. "Gordon Brown!" Foolishly, Maddy follows Charlotte's advice and goes for the Chancellor.

Wrong.

"John Prescott?"

Wrong again.

"It's John Major, innit?" chips in Charlotte, who clearly doesn't know when to stop digging.

How about geography? The capital of the United States causes much confusion. Charlotte is convinced it's New York, Heather (fiancee of Cardiff City's Michael Chopra) reckons it's Texas.

Next up is literature and Heather can't remember the surname of the Emily who wrote Wuthering Heights.

But at least she doesn't think it was JK Rowling, like Charlotte. "Tell us you're joking," says Elle.

"No, I'm serious," replies Charlotte. "I've not even heard of Wuthering Heights, actually."

Heather redeems herself by answering that the Home Secretary is John Reid (after a couple of generous clues).

But then Maddy lets the side down by proclaiming LA to be on the east coast of America and they all get a yellow card for believing the Berlin Wall was built to separate Germany and Russia.

Finally, Charlotte guesses that VAT stands for Vital Annual Tax. Mmm, sorry girls, you could do A LOT better.

But there's one subject the girls are very comfortable on - and that's shopping.

"I get excited about fashion," says Heather, 24. "Sorry if that sounds sad. But the shops aren't great in Cardiff. I have to come to London. And I do a lot of internet shopping."

Refreshingly, the girls all love their food. Maddy tucks into a steak sandwich while Elle and Heather polish off giant portions of bangers and mash. Charlotte, when she eventually does turn up, plumps for the bangers, too.

And, of course, they love a gossip. The appearance of fellow WAG Danielle Lloyd on Celebrity Big Brother is still a hot topic.

"I've got the same manager as her and I know for a fact that she's not racist," says Maddy. "I think she was just naive."

Do they think Teddy Sheringham should have stood by her rather than leaving her dangling until the storm died down?

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