'This Is Not by Me'

By Lydiate, Henry | Art Monthly, March 2006 | Go to article overview

'This Is Not by Me'


Lydiate, Henry, Art Monthly


The Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board's denied authentication of works that many have otherwise taken to be by Andy Warhol has been in the news since the winter of 2003 when the collector Joe Simon first went public on the board's denial of a silkscreen painting that he had bought for $195,000 as an investment in 1988, within a year of Warhol's death. Since then there have been numerous reports of disgruntled collectors and dealers who have fallen foul of the Authentication Board. Simon's painting, like many, appeared to have a well-established provenance. Warhol had made an acetate of a photographic self-portrait, which he gave to a friend, Richard Ekstract, to make the silkscreens as decorations for a party celebrating the premiere of Warhol's first underground video. Ekstract sent the acetate to a printer. After the party Warhol gave the pictures to Ekstract in gratitude for his having facilitated both the video production and the party. Ekstract gave some of the limited edition to partygoers. The Andy Warhol Foundation (established by Warhol through his will) authenticated Simon's picture, as did Fred Hughes who was the sole executor of Warhol's will and his former business manager. Recently, Simon proposed to sell his picture for around 1.4m [pounds sterling], and a potential buyer submitted it to the Andy Warhol Authentication Board, Inc.

Information about the operations of the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board, Inc is hard to find. It is a limited liability company registered in New York State. Its website is minimal, merely saying 'a procedure has been established for the authentication of works of art purportedly by Andy Warhol', that it 'does not offer any appraisal services', gives Claudia Defendi as the contact name, a Manhattan address and telephone number. Its website address is through the Andy Warhol Foundation For Visual Arts, Inc: www.warholfoundation.org/authen.htm. The Warhol Foundation is a separate limited liability company also registered in New York State, and its website offers the link directly to the Art Authentication Board--without further explanation of their legal or business relationship.

The Warhol Foundation, not the Art Authentication Board, was established through Warhol's will and was therefore the legal body specifically trusted and empowered by him to safeguard and promote his artistic legacy. Indeed, the Warhol Foundation has commissioned and already published two volumes of Warhol's Catalogue Raisonne (paintings and sculpture from 1961 to 1969), with more volumes in train. Given these uniquely authoritative publications sponsored by the Warhol Foundation, it is difficult to fathom why it does not itself authenticate authorship of 'works purportedly by Andy Warhol'. Applicants to the Art Authentication Board say that it does not certify nor discuss why it denies authentication (to around one in six submissions). It is widely believed that the board's essential criterion for authenticating a work is whether it is satisfied that there is good evidence of Warhol having supervised and overseen its creation. Given the common knowledge and ample documentary evidence of Warhol's unique and deliberately perverse ways of working--especially during The Factory years--it might have again been expected that the Warhol Foundation was the best body to understand such ways of working, to interpret and decide any authentication issues.

Art historian and friend of Warhol John Richardson owns works given to him directly by Warhol, but has said that even he would not 'dare submit these things to the board for fear of being told they're not by Andy', and questions whether it is possible to authenticate Warhol's output: 'he used to do these silkscreens, and assistants would come in at night and run off a few copies for themselves. But did they make them any less authentic than the ones they ran off for Andy during the day?'. For many years Warhol engaged teams of assistants to execute his ideas.

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