Hounding of the Don Who Dared Speak out on Migrants

Daily Mail (London), March 3, 2007 | Go to article overview

Hounding of the Don Who Dared Speak out on Migrants


Byline: HARRY MOUNT

LEADING academics yesterday defended an eminent Oxford professor against a students' call for him to be sacked for his links to an immigration think-tank.

Oxford Student Action for Refugees has circulated a petition seeking the removal of Professor David Coleman, a leading expert in demographics, because of his connections with MigrationWatch.

The students believe that because MigrationWatch warns about the negative effects of present and future immigration, it is inherently racist.

But Professor Coleman condemned what he called a 'shameful attack on academic independence and freedom of speech'.

He questioned whether the students involved should be allowed to stay at the university themselves.

Among his defenders was Professor John Salt, director of the Migration Research Unit at University College London.

He said: 'David Coleman is probably the best all-round demographer in the country when it comes to linking demographic information to immigration statistics.' In 2005, Professor Salt concluded in work for the Home Office that there were around 500,000 illegal immigrants in Britain.

After shocked reactions to the size of his estimate, the then immigration minister, Des Browne, denied it was an official figure.

It later turned out to be an underestimate.

There was more support from Professor Norman Stone, once Margaret Thatcher's foreign policy adviser on Europe. He came

under a similar attack from students at Oxford, where he was Professor of Modern History from 1984 to 1995, after he was accused of sexism.

Professor Stone said: 'What a nuisance - it's an absurd overreaction. The poor darlings.

It just shows they've got nothing better to do. They're just striking attitudes.

They're a pest.'

current levels of immigration.

Professor Coleman co-founded MigrationWatch with Sir Andrew Green, a former ambassador to Saudi Arabia, in 2001 and remains an honorary consultant.

The think-tank emphasises the contribution of refugees to the country but doubts whether Britain can successfully handle

The students claim the professor is bringing Oxford into disrepute by using his academic title to legitimise alleged anti-immigration views in the media.

They have petitioned Oxford's vice-chancellor, Dr John Hood, to 'consider the suitability of Coleman's continued tenure as a professor'. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Hounding of the Don Who Dared Speak out on Migrants
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.