Pedometer-Assessed Physical Activity Level and Body Composition among Minority Children in an After-School Physical Education Program

By Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping et al. | Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, February 2007 | Go to article overview

Pedometer-Assessed Physical Activity Level and Body Composition among Minority Children in an After-School Physical Education Program


Agbuga, Bulent, Xiang, Ping, McBride, Ron E., Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport


A great deal of research has documented relationships between pedometer-assessed physical activity level and body composition (Raustorp, Pangrazi & Stahle, 2004; Tudor-Locke et al., 2001; Tudor-Locke et al., 2004). This is because such inquiry can help understand the relations of physical activity to health outcomes and identify risk groups including obese and sedentary individuals. But most of participants in this work came from white and middle class communities. Moreover, physical activity level was measured by the total number of steps participants took in each single day, which may weaken the reliability and validity of the results (e.g., Raustorp et al., 2004; Tudor-Locke et al., 2004). To address these two issues, the current investigation examined relationships between pedometer-assessed physical activity level and body composition among low socioeconomic minority children in an after-school physical education program. Participants included 47 students in grade 3-6 (25 boys and 22 girls; 66% African American and 34% Hispanic-American) from one school district, who were qualified for participation in the after school physical education program. To assess participants' physical activity level, they were instructed to carry the pedometers for the entire after-school physical education class time for five consecutive lessons. The mean step counts for these five consecutive lessons served as a measure of physical activity level (M = 1573, SD = 371). …

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