Podcasts Pep Up College Writing Class Curriculum

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 6, 2007 | Go to article overview

Podcasts Pep Up College Writing Class Curriculum


Byline: Kristen Chick, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Producing podcasts is not a typical assignment in college writing class, but it's what Heather Schell requires from her students at George Washington University.

Miss Schell, assistant professor in the school's University Writing Program, asked her freshman writing class last year to produce a weekly "radio show," a series of podcasts they wrote, recorded, edited and posted on the Web.

"I really enjoyed it," said one of the students, Kirsten Gilbert, who began the class as a "technophobe" and ended as a podcast pro."I learned a lot about podcasting. It taught you how to write pieces to be heard, not to be read."

Miss Schell is among an increasing number of college professors to use podcasts - audio files that can downloaded to IPods and computers - as they discover the advantages of technologically savvy teaching, said Suzan Harkness, assistant professor of political science at the University of the District of Columbia.

Mrs. Harkness recently completed the first national study of podcast use in college education. During the 18 months of her survey, the number of universities she tracked that used podcasts increased from five to 278.

The study also found that most educational podcasts are recorded lectures, while 15 percent are produced by students for a course. Almost two-thirds of respondents said their use had no effect on class attendance.

Mrs. Harkness said the number of professors using podcasts will most likely continue to grow, "especially when they realize that it does not impact attendance," she said. "It's not expensive. It's something you can do with a laptop, a desktop and a microphone."

Area professors say they use audio files for supplemental material, grading papers or as study guides, or require students to produce their own podcasts as class projects.

For grading papers, professors record their comments, then the grade so students will listen to the comments instead of just flipping past them to find the grade.

But requiring students to create their own podcasts is also a popular use of the audio files.

"The creativity that gets unleashed by the podcasts is just phenomenal," said Nanette Levinson, associate professor of international relations at American University. "It really enhances [students'] creativity and their ability to communicate effectively."

Mrs. Levinson, who was inspired to begin using podcasts by her 16-year-old nephew, has been using them in the classroom for two years, though this was the first year she began requiring them from students.

One podcast created by her students for an assignment begins with tense music, fading into Arabic voices telling stories of hardship while a voice-over translates. Then students describe a fictional soccer camp they propose to create in Palestine, bringing Israeli and Palestinian children together.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Podcasts Pep Up College Writing Class Curriculum
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.