Police Give Fearful Levi a Panic Button; Sports Agenda

Daily Mail (London), March 10, 2007 | Go to article overview

Police Give Fearful Levi a Panic Button; Sports Agenda


Byline: CHARLES SALE

POLICE are taking the fears of a former Leeds director that he will be attacked by disgruntled fans seriously enough to equip him with various precautionary devices.

Melvyn Levi's house has been supplied with a panic alarm connected to the West Yorkshire Police headquarters, and Levi, his wife and son have been given personal safety alarms.

The moves came after Leeds chairman Ken Bates launched an outspoken attack on Levi in his programme notes. He blamed Levi, who has [pounds sterling]1.5million invested in Elland Road, for the club's problems and printed his address.

Levi claims to be terrified that Bates's comments - repeated in the Yorkshire Post this week - would lead to some fans trying to take retribution against him or his family, especially if Leeds lose against Luton today.

The Levi camp, worried about more personal attacks by Bates, have gained an interim injunction stopping today's programme being distributed or sold until a Leeds High Court rules on the contents this morning.

Levi, who has not spoken to Bates for more than a year, found himself in the same Leeds restaurant, the Flying Pizza, on Thursday night. Levi asked Bates if they could discuss their differences. Leeds vice-chairman Jayne McGuinness, who was dining with Bates and his wife Susannah, said it was the wrong time. Bates offered Levi a handshake but made no comment.

West Yorkshire police said: 'We have received allegations from both parties against each other, which we are investigating.' SIR GARRY SOBERS, who will open the World Cup at the Trewlawny Stadium in Jamaica tomorrow, will be reminded of what he calls 'the saddest moment of my life' during his trip to the island. A World Cup stamp features Jamaican Test batsman Collie Smith, who died aged 26 in a crash on the A34 near Stone in Staffordshire in September 1959. Sobers, who was driving, claimed to have been blinded by headlights when he ran into a lorry. …

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