Better Coordination of Mental, Physical Health Care Urged: Report Cites Early Deaths of Mentally Ill

By Schneider, Mary Ellen | Clinical Psychiatry News, February 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Better Coordination of Mental, Physical Health Care Urged: Report Cites Early Deaths of Mentally Ill


Schneider, Mary Ellen, Clinical Psychiatry News


Psychiatrists and other members of the mental health community are working on ways to improve coordination of mental health and primary care in an effort to decrease early death among people with serious mental illness.

People being treated for serious mental illness by public mental health systems die 25 years earlier, on average, than do members of the general population, according to a report released by the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD) Medical Directors Council. About 60% of these premature deaths are attributable to medical conditions such as cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.

The report, "Morbidity and Mortality in People with Serious Mental Illness," outlines the factors contributing to this disparity in death and disease.

"This is a virtual epidemic of death," said Dr. Joseph Parks, medical director for the Missouri Department of Mental Health and president of the NASMHPD Medical Directors Council.

The report has become a sort of "rallying point," Dr. Parks said. NASMHPD is in the process of drafting a position paper on this topic and has held a series of meetings with stakeholders throughout the mental health community.

The report, released in the fall, found that the increase in mortality and morbidity is attributable in large part to preventable conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, respiratory diseases, and infectious disease, including HIV/AIDS. And mental health patients also are at greater risk for death and disease because they have generally higher rates of smoking, alcohol and drug use, poor nutrition and obesity, and unsafe sexual behavior.

Second-generation antipsychotic medications also have been associated with weight gain, diabetes, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome, according to the report. Access to health care is another significant factor in the higher morbidity and mortality among the seriously mentally ill, the report noted.

The report supports several national, state, and clinician-level solutions including:

* Designating the seriously mentally ill as a health disparities population.

* Adopting national surveillance activities on the health status of individuals with serious mental illness.

* Improving access to physical health care services.

* Promoting coordinated and integrated mental and physical health care services.

* Increasing Medicaid funding to cover smoking cessation and weight reduction treatments for seriously mental ill patients.

* Improving comprehensive health care evaluations by physicians.

One key strategy to improving coordination is moving toward the co-location of mental health and primary care services, Dr. Parks said.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Better Coordination of Mental, Physical Health Care Urged: Report Cites Early Deaths of Mentally Ill
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.