Editor's foreword/Avant-Propos Du Directeur

By Armony, Victor | Canadian Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Studies, July 2006 | Go to article overview

Editor's foreword/Avant-Propos Du Directeur


Armony, Victor, Canadian Journal of Latin American & Caribbean Studies


You have in your hands the 30th anniversary issue of the Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Our Journal was founded in 1976 in a vastly different context: a decade that had begun with widespread hopes for democracy and economic development was turning into a dark period of military dictatorship in most parts of the region. The National Security Doctrine--a Cold War-era counterinsurgency ideology--provided those regimes with the justification to root out dissident political and social organizations and establish a highly repressive order. Thirty years later, we can marvel at how much things have changed in Latin America and the Caribbean ... and how much some things remain the same. Electoral democracy, even if limited and imperfect, has been achieved virtually everywhere, and the armed forces no longer play the role of political arbitrator. However, the extreme inequality that plagues the continent still lingers. The socialist, populist, and insurrectionary experiments of the 1970s had varying goals and strategies, but they were all fuelled by the everyday reality of social injustice. The current wave of "left-wing governments" is rooted in the same demand for societal change. The democratic transition in the 1980s, followed by the market-oriented reforms in the 1990s, gave way to a painful cycle of increased expectations and ever-deeper frustration, and in Latin America the new century dawned with growing unrest and a resurgence of popular protest. Yet, most social and political movements--including many leaders and the people who voted for them--frame their claims in terms of rights and citizenship, not class warfare or revolution.

But what does citizenship mean today in Latin America? The Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies devotes its 30th anniversary issue to this particularly relevant question. Our guest editors, Jane Jenson and Stephanie Rousseau, have assembled a fascinating collection of papers that deal with what they call the "contested boundaries of citizenship." I am sure that our readers will appreciate the quality and diversity of approaches found in this special anniversary issue. Anniversaries lead us to celebration, but also to introspection and self-evaluation. That is why we also wanted to take a look at the last 10 years of our Journal. Jose del Pozo--who has been CJLACS Managing Editor during most of the 1990s--kindly agreed to classify and index the articles published from 1996 to 2005. In his review, he points out some accomplishments that we can be proud of, as well as a few challenges that still lay ahead. Let me also mention that we launched the "CJLACS 30th Anniversary Graduate Student Essay Competition." I thank the members of the jury--Rita De Grandis, Julia Murphy, Philip Oxhorn, and Sylvain Turcotte--who assessed the almost 30 eligible essays submitted from five different countries in four different languages.

The picture on the cover shows a collage ("Untitled," 1990) by Norberto Majlis, an Argentinean-Brazilian-Canadian artist. He has had 11 solo exhibitions, and participated in many collective art exhibitions in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Canada, France, and Italy. He obtained the first prize for prints in the 29th Art Salon of the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, several awards in Italy, and an award in the Art Contest of the Pierrefonds Cultural Centre of Montreal. Majlis immigrated to Canada in 1996.

Vous avez entre vos mains le numero du 30eme anniversaire de la Revue canadienne des etudes latino-americaines et caraibes. Notre Revue a ete creee en 1976 dans un contexte tres different : une decennie qui avait commence avec de grands espoirs de democratie et de developpement economique menait vers une sombre periode de dictature militaire dans la region. …

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