A Professional Code of Ethics and Progress Report: One University's Approach to Addressing Disruptive Behaviors in the Classroom; Professors, like Elementary School Teachers, Must Deal with Their Share of Childish Behavior or See Their Teaching Undermined

By Murphy, Kelle L. | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, February 2007 | Go to article overview

A Professional Code of Ethics and Progress Report: One University's Approach to Addressing Disruptive Behaviors in the Classroom; Professors, like Elementary School Teachers, Must Deal with Their Share of Childish Behavior or See Their Teaching Undermined


Murphy, Kelle L., JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


Disruptive behaviors by students in the college classroom have become a growing concern among educators in all disciplines (Bru, Stephens, & Torsheim, 2002; Wayda & Lund, 2005; Wilson, 2005). These disruptive behaviors include arriving late to class or leaving early, talking with peers during lectures, verbally expressing dissatisfaction over assignments or grades, making sarcastic comments, leaving exams noisily (Boice, 1996; Mishra, 1992), sleeping during lectures (Kilmer, 1998), exhibiting academic dishonesty (LaBeff, Clark, Haines, & Diekhoff, 1990), reading the newspaper in class (Heinemann, 1996; Herr, 1989), asking questions that are irrelevant, exhibiting bad manners (Heinemann, 1996), and text-messaging friends with cell phones. These behaviors must be addressed and modified if effective learning is to take place and if physical education teacher education (PETE) candidates are to become effective educators.

Accountability and responsibility have become key topics in the educational arena (National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2004). Consequently, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) has developed and implemented standards as a form of accountability, to ensure that teacher candidates acquire and demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective PreK-12 educators (NCATE, 2002). The first NCATE standard addresses candidates' knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Physical education teacher education students are expected to behave in a professional and ethical manner when teaching students, or interacting and communicating with colleagues and the community. Unfortunately, PETE students do not always demonstrate those desirable behaviors in the college classroom.

The purpose of this article is to examine disruptive behaviors in the college classroom; offer strategies that will help diminish the occurrence of disruptive behaviors; explore the role of a conceptual framework and professional code of ethics; and promote professional behaviors by PETE students in educator licensure programs through the use of professional progress reports.

The Origins of Disruptive Behaviors

Examining the origins of disruptive behaviors is the critical first step to developing an effective plan of action. Educators in colleges and universities must understand these behaviors and the types of students who will be coming to their classrooms. They must also find ways to partner with their colleagues in elementary and secondary schools to promote smooth transitions from one level to the next. Elementary school educators often complain that their students come ill-prepared to learn and that much of their time is spent addressing social issues rather than educational issues. These social issues range from the extreme of abuse, neglect, and homelessness, to working parents who are too tired or unavailable to prepare nutritious meals, assist with homework, or resolve sibling conflicts. At the secondary school level, this leads to poor performance in school, loss of self-esteem, acting out, and skipping classes. At the college level, these issues lead to a lack of preparation for college academics, inadequate reading and writing skills, mental health problems, lack of direction, lack of awareness of how to behave in the classroom (Kilmer, 1998), and not feeling challenged. Behaviors also may be a function of maturity, lack of attention, or lack of socialization (Mishra, 1992).

Further, students may not take ownership of these behaviors or fully understand their seriousness. For example, when addressing the issue of academic dishonesty, students often rationalize their behavior. They admit that cheating is wrong for everyone else, but justify their own cheating in various ways (LaBeff et al., 1990). Students sometimes deny their responsibility when it comes to cheating, blame the incident on the perceived unfairness of the teacher, or rationalize it as acceptable in order to assist a peer (LaBeff et al.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Professional Code of Ethics and Progress Report: One University's Approach to Addressing Disruptive Behaviors in the Classroom; Professors, like Elementary School Teachers, Must Deal with Their Share of Childish Behavior or See Their Teaching Undermined
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.