Letter: The Facts on Pay Review

The Birmingham Post (England), March 20, 2007 | Go to article overview

Letter: The Facts on Pay Review


Byline: Coun ALAN RUDGE

Dear Editor, I would like to respond to some of the points raised in an anonymous letter recently published in your paper (Shambles of council pay evaluation, Post Letters, March 13) and at the same time reiterate Birmingham City Council's current position regarding the Pay and Grading Review, which will be implemented in September 2007 and backdated to April 2007.

First of all the letter erroneously states a third of employees will face pay cuts. This is a dramatic and inexplicable overestimate when we have clearly communicated to all our staff that half this number, no more than 14.4 per cent of staff, will see a reduction in salary. We are working with staff and the trade unions to reduce this even further.

Contrary to the impression given in this letter, the salaries of 43.2 per cent of staff will remain the same and 42.4 per cent will see an increase in their salary. This means at least 85.6 per cent of employees will have no change, or see an increase in their salary.

Moreover, of those people that will see a reduction, half will lose less than pounds 2,000.

The Council has a responsibility to the citizens of Birmingham and a legal obligation to manage its finances prudently and ensure a sustainable pay model. We need to balance our budget whilst at the same time having a fair, consistent and transparent pay structure. It is ridiculous to suggest otherwise.

It is completely untrue that anyone will lose pay "overnight".

We are naturally concerned some people will be losing through the Pay and Grading Review process and, as a good employer, we are making every effort to protect basic pay for those who find themselves in this position, within the limitations allowed by law.

In addition we are exploring the arrangements for a hardship fund for individual cases of significant change. …

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