Flavors to Savor: Home of Fat Tire Ale, Colorado's New Belgium Brewing Mixes Old World Methods and Cutting-Edge Production. Its Great Beer Inspired Our Hearty Recipes

By True, Margo | Sunset, March 2007 | Go to article overview

Flavors to Savor: Home of Fat Tire Ale, Colorado's New Belgium Brewing Mixes Old World Methods and Cutting-Edge Production. Its Great Beer Inspired Our Hearty Recipes


True, Margo, Sunset


A TOUR OF New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins, Colorado, begins at a display of beer ingredients: hops, barley, wheat. All the usual suspects. But then there's kaffir-lime leaves and orange peel. And the barley and orange peel are laid out in the shape of a peace sign.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

That's your first clue that this place differs from the state's big corporate brewers (Coors and Anheuser-Busch, which has a local brewery). "There's always been a perception of us as having an easygoing, hippie vibe," says Bryan Simpson, New Belgium's media relations director. "But there's also a lot of emphasis on excellence." It's paying off: While investing heavily in cutting-edge green technology, New Belgium has become one of the fastest-growing craft brewers in the United States, and its beers--modeled after the complex, free-spirited ales of Belgium--have won multiple awards.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Upstairs in the brew room sit four giant conical steel tanks that look like the nose cones of spaceships. Through windows on each, you can see the journey of beer--the barley as it's mixed with water, filtered to make sweet liquid called wort, and boiled with hops for flavor. Then it's piped below to the cellar, where the yeast goes to work on the sugars, converting them to alcohol. Once it's beer, it's piped into the chugging, steam-hissing bottling room next door.

The entire operation, you learn as you sip your way from toasty Fat Tire to rich, mahogany-hued Abbey in the tasting room, is largely powered by wind energy. And New Belgium is forward-thinking in other ways, donating $1 to environmental and social causes for every barrel of beer it sells (it raised $400,000 last year). The company is entirely employee-owned, and staffers get a case of beer every week, a bike after one year, and a trip to Belgium after five.

"We hold tight to ethical standards and who we want to be on the planet," says Jennifer Orgolini, the chief operations officer. New Belgium's beers are terrific, but it does a lot more than just make fine brews.

INFO New Belgium Brewing (www.new belgium.com or 888/622-4044) gives free brewery tours and tastings Mon-Sat. For our tasting notes on its beers, visit www.sunset.com/beer Resources: See page 142.

Beer-battered cod and onion rings

Crunchy, light, and addictive.

PREP AND COOK TIME About 1 hour

MAKES 4 servings

NOTES Serve with malt vinegar and tartar sauce, if you like.

1 cup all-purpose flour
3/4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt, plus more for sprinkling on onion
     rings and fish
1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
1 egg
3/4 cup (half a 12-oz. bottle) medium-bodied
     ale (such as New Belgium's Fat Tire)
Vegetable oil for frying
1 yellow onion, sliced into 1/2-in.-thick rings
1 1/2 lbs. skinless cod fillets, rinsed and cut into
     2- by 4-in. pieces
1 lemon, sliced paper-thin
1 cup flat-leaf parsley sprigs, stems trimmed

1. Whisk flour, baking powder, 1/2 tsp. salt, pepper, egg, and beer in a large bowl.

2. Preheat oven to 200[degrees]. In a 6- to 8-qt. pot, heat 2 in. of oil to 375[degrees] over medium-high heat. Add onion to batter, turn to coat well, then put several onion rings in pot (do not crowd). Cook, turning often, until golden brown, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a rack set over a sheet pan, sprinkle with salt, and put in oven to keep warm. Repeat with remaining onions.

3. Allow oil to return to 375[degrees] and skim to remove any batter bits. Add fish to batter and turn to coat well. Cook fish in hot oil, turning and holding down as needed, until deep golden brown, about 7 minutes. Drain on rack and sprinkle with salt.

4. Add lemon slices and parsley to oil and cook until crisp, about 1 minute.

5. Pile fish and onion rings on a platter and garnish with fried lemon slices and parsley.

PER SERVING 427 CAL.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Flavors to Savor: Home of Fat Tire Ale, Colorado's New Belgium Brewing Mixes Old World Methods and Cutting-Edge Production. Its Great Beer Inspired Our Hearty Recipes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.