How Your Ethics Can Give You a Real Edge; PROPERTY VALUES after Years of Preaching on Corporate Social Responsibility, the Deeper Influence of Ethics Is about to Take Centre Stage in the Business Property Sector. If Developers Don't Buy in, Says Ian McPhillips, Partner at Birmingham-Based Property Consultants Curry & Partners, They Will Lose Out

The Birmingham Post (England), March 22, 2007 | Go to article overview

How Your Ethics Can Give You a Real Edge; PROPERTY VALUES after Years of Preaching on Corporate Social Responsibility, the Deeper Influence of Ethics Is about to Take Centre Stage in the Business Property Sector. If Developers Don't Buy in, Says Ian McPhillips, Partner at Birmingham-Based Property Consultants Curry & Partners, They Will Lose Out


Byline: Ian McPhillips

Mention the word ethics to most property people and they will assume that you are talking about a county east of London - and that you have a lisp.

Seriously though, ignorance of the importance of ethics in our sector is a far too common occurrence, particularly when ethics' closest cousin, corporate social responsibility, is becoming so prominent.

Attitudes are about to change, however, with the news that an EU directive is due to come into force at the end of this year, citing that social and environmental issues can be given consideration in public procurement projects.

The impact of this legislation on the property sector could be as deep as it is widespread.

You only have to look at the actions of two of the UK's largest developers, British Land and Land Securities, to see the effect that is likely to ripple down the chain.

Both of these entities are taking part in a working group looking at ethical procurement and its impact on business operations and community relations.

Changes to working practices are being made which take account of existing and potential ethics-based demands from the marketplace.

Large clients, such as the government, and sizeable institutional investors are already passing on their ethical requirements to developers.

Many are starting to study the carbon footprint that their properties will leave behind and are looking careful at the source and construction of building materials.

There are demands that timber is from sustainable sources, that energy usage is minimised both in the building of the property and in its subsequent maintenance, that recycled products are used wherever possible, and that materials are produced by a country which does not exploit its workers or break acceptable carbon limits in its transportation to the building site.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Your Ethics Can Give You a Real Edge; PROPERTY VALUES after Years of Preaching on Corporate Social Responsibility, the Deeper Influence of Ethics Is about to Take Centre Stage in the Business Property Sector. If Developers Don't Buy in, Says Ian McPhillips, Partner at Birmingham-Based Property Consultants Curry & Partners, They Will Lose Out
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.