Ghana: Ecotourism Is Becoming a Major Revenue Earner; Neglected for a Long Period, Ecotourism Is Now Fashionable in Ghana. Tourists Are Encouraged to Visit Unique and Interesting Destinations, to Have Fulfilled Cultural Exchanges, and Contribute to the Conservation and Sustainable Development of the Environment

New African, March 2007 | Go to article overview

Ghana: Ecotourism Is Becoming a Major Revenue Earner; Neglected for a Long Period, Ecotourism Is Now Fashionable in Ghana. Tourists Are Encouraged to Visit Unique and Interesting Destinations, to Have Fulfilled Cultural Exchanges, and Contribute to the Conservation and Sustainable Development of the Environment


The Ghana Tourist Board (GTB), the regulator of the tourism industry in the country, has drawn up land use plans to guide investors to lands around 21 selected attraction spots as priorities for development.

According to Frank Kofigah, GTB's planning and business development manager, the land use plans are meant to ensure and control the judicious use of land around the attraction spots. The objective is to guide investors as to what projects are acceptable in order to avoid unplanned development around the attractions.

GTB also seeks to establish land banks around the attractions for investors. This is to avoid land litigation cases which often come about through double sales and ownership disputes. The GTB will establish ownership of these lands, pay adequate compensation to their owners, and acquire them for investors.

The GTB has been praised for its highly successful "Domestic Tourism Awareness Drive" which has hugely enhanced its Community-Based Ecotourism Projects (CBEPs).

Ecotourism or the conservation and preservation of natural resources, is a new discovery on the tourism scene. Ecotourism seeks to create wealth in the indigenous communities and reduce poverty. It attempts to provide an alternative livelihood to the host communities, whilst conserving and preserving the natural and cultural resources. It combines the experiences of the natural environment with the culture and lifestyle of the host communities.

The GTB, in collaboration with foreign partners--the Nature Conservation Research Centre, SNV Netherlands Development Organisation, and Peace Corps-Ghana--has 15 ongoing CBEPs around the countryside. They are being funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

These selected attraction destinations boast of unique natural endowments against the backdrop of interesting cultures, in basically rural communities. They range from picturesque views of landscapes, lush vegetation and waterfalls, hikes through tropical rain forests, mountain-climbing, encounters with endangered species of monkeys, crocodiles, hippos and elephants, as well as interactions with friendly village folks.

To ensure the sustainability of the CBEPs, there are Tourism Management Teams (TMTs), composed of representatives of the host communities, GTB, the host district assemblies and other interested groups at each destination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ghana: Ecotourism Is Becoming a Major Revenue Earner; Neglected for a Long Period, Ecotourism Is Now Fashionable in Ghana. Tourists Are Encouraged to Visit Unique and Interesting Destinations, to Have Fulfilled Cultural Exchanges, and Contribute to the Conservation and Sustainable Development of the Environment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.