Boxing: Reality TV Right Down to the Blood

The Mirror (London, England), March 24, 2007 | Go to article overview

Boxing: Reality TV Right Down to the Blood


Byline: BARRY McGUIGAN

THE Contender makes its British debut next Friday in Newcastle.

The format is simple, Britain versus America, eight bouts that could change the lives of the winners.

For British boxers like Paul Smith, Anthony Small and Ross Minter, the show offers a fantastic opportunity to become a household name.

For the likes of Robin Reid it's a last bite at the cherry.

The point is that the fighters are not being judged simply on their ability in the ring. It is their characters, their personalities that are to be examined, too.

This is reality TV at its most honest. The punches are genuine, the blood is real.

Each bout will be the focus of a one-hour ITV show. Each episode will go into the background of the fighters, reveal details of their personal lives, show them at work and play.

All of these boys have a story to tell. Reid's starring role in the production of top shelf material should make interesting viewing.

None was born with a silver spoon in his mouth. How they got to this point in their lives adds up to fantastic drama. The fact that there is something resting on the outcomes makes the experience very real.

Next month American Contender Peter Manfredo takes on Joe Calzaghe for the WBO super-middleweight crown.

Another Contender success, Sergio Moorer, was offered a shot at middleweight king Jermain Taylor.

All these boys can fight. Reid has held the WBC crown at super-middle. At the other end of the scale, Smith, Small and Minter are real prospects with a chance to forward their case in this series.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Boxing: Reality TV Right Down to the Blood
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.